independent and unofficial
Prince fan community site
Sat 22nd Sep 2018 7:16pm
Welcome! Sign up or enter username and password to remember me
Forum jump
Forums > Politics & Religion > Papa John's
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Page 1 of 2 12>
  New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
Author

Tweet     Share

Message
Thread started 07/11/18 8:07pm

benni

Papa John's

https://www.cbsnews.com/n...ur-n-word/


I need some advice regarding this topic, too. As I've mentioned before, my day job is as a social worker. I work with elderly and disabled individuals who are on Medicaid and want to remain home rather than going into a nursing home or other facility. We put services in place to allow them to remain as independent as possible in their own home.

However, my financial situation is such that I have to work a second job. My second job is as a delivery driver for Papa John's. After I read this report today, I almost called out tonight and was going to turn in my uniform and car topper. There are other jobs available, but I don't know if they would be willing to work with me on my schedule the way my manager at Papa John's has (given my health, having two kids at home, etc.). My manager there is a young, 20 something African American female and she is just way toooooo sweet. I absolutely adore her and she calls me the "mom" of the store. (I'm the oldest female working there and since I'm also a social worker, the young kids usually come to me for advice.)

I did talk with her about the above news article and I could tell how deeply it affected her. Not only was she hurt, because she puts her heart and soul into this position and has been proud to be the manager, but she was angry, too. Justifiably so. And I was angry on her behalf, other co-workers' behalfs, and just in general, because this should not be an issue in this day and age. She asked me to stay on, for her, but at the same time, I don't want to support this kind of racist attitude from the CEO/owner.

Another friend on twitter, suggested that I write a letter and have everyone at work sign it, stating our concerns with the statement, how it effects our work environment and pride in the company, and how these kinds of statements hurt the employees. I think this is an excellent suggestion and plan to implement it, but wanted to find other ways to support my co-workers, let them know how very much they are all loved and appreciated, while also getting the message across to the higher ups that this behavior is not acceptable. Any advice would be welcome, except the "quit your job". I was going to do that tonight, but after talking with the manager, I realize she is not in as good of a position as I am to be able to just quit and find another position. I want to be there for her if I can.


  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #1 posted 07/11/18 8:48pm

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

avatar

This is a difficult question for many many reasons. I think it’s best you decide this one on your own.
My own gut reaction is to never go there again. But it’s not that big of a sacrifice for me. And I never thought much of that brand in the first place. A lot of good people work there that have nothing to do with the owner but I just can’t go there ever again. It’s forever tainted for me.
Crooked Donnie. Lock him up!
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #2 posted 07/11/18 9:00pm

benni

Ugot2shakesumthin said:

This is a difficult question for many many reasons. I think it’s best you decide this one on your own. My own gut reaction is to never go there again. But it’s not that big of a sacrifice for me. And I never thought much of that brand in the first place. A lot of good people work there that have nothing to do with the owner but I just can’t go there ever again. It’s forever tainted for me.


My 14 year old daughter has already stated that she no longer wants to eat their pizza and I agree. But, there truly are some good people that work there and I want to support them. My gut instinct was to not to go back either, but after talking with my manager, she had a point when she commented that "If you leave, then it's giving his comments power." She's a good person and she deserves so much better than what Schnatter has given with his racist comments. But at the same time, I don't want to do nothing, because I feel like that sends the wrong message too.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #3 posted 07/12/18 7:01am

2elijah

avatar

I believe you have a good heart and soul, and it easy to understand why you feel that way, and if you feel uncomfortable working in a place where the CEO feels that way about people you work around, then do what you feel is right for you. I had no idea the CEO of Papa John was so racist, yet many Black Americans have supported his business for years. I'm pretty sure he is not the only one, who runs a major company and has that type of racist attitude towards Black Americans. There are many within various places of employment, like him, so he probably won’t be the last, wherever you work.

All I can say is do what feels right for you. The good thing is that he resigned. The only person who could change his racist attitude is him. You’re not him and the good thing is that he resigned.

The problem is that when business owners like him, make those kinds of comments, it does not help improve race relations in this country, and it just plays to the racist/stereotype generalizations this society often labels many. It also brings those he offended, out to protest and boycott businesses, with a possibility of shutting that business down and innocent employees losing their jobs, over one ignorant, idiot’s insecurities and hatred towards another race. If you fear that maybe someone will take the CEO’s racist rant out on you, then I can understand why that could be a possible reason to leave as well.
[Edited 7/12/18 7:04am]
FEARLESS
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #4 posted 07/12/18 7:22am

benni

2elijah said:

I believe you have a good heart and soul, and it easy to understand why you feel that way, and if you feel uncomfortable working in a place where the CEO feels that way about people you work around, then do what you feel is right for you. I had no idea the CEO of Papa John was so racist, yet many Black Americans have supported his business for years. I'm pretty sure he is not the only one, who runs a major company and has that type of racist attitude towards Black Americans. There are many within various places of employment, like him, so he probably won’t be the last, wherever you work. All I can say is do what feels right for you. The good thing is that he resigned. The only person who could change his racist attitude is him. You’re not him and the good thing is that he resigned. The problem is that when business owners like him, make those kinds of comments, it does not help improve race relations in this country, and it just plays to the racist/stereotype generalizations this society often labels many. It also brings those he offended, out to protest and boycott businesses, with a possibility of shutting that business down and innocent employees losing their jobs, over one ignorant, idiot’s insecurities and hatred towards another race. If you fear that maybe someone will take the CEO’s racist rant out on you, then I can understand why that could be a possible reason to leave as well. [Edited 7/12/18 7:04am]


2elijah, I've always respected your opinion, so want to ask: If you were working in a company in which your CEO had made those types of racist comments, how would you want your co-workers to support you? I want to do something for my co-workers, especially my manager, to show my support and let them know they aren't alone. And to let them know that not everyone is like Schnatter, though every day the news is showing there are more like him than not. It's just not right, 2elijah. It's just not. And I will never be able to wrap my head around how anyone can believe that way or act that way. Christenna, my manager, is the sweetest, most loving woman I've met and to look at her as anything less than that just because of the color of her skin, just doesn't make sense to me. But how can I show her the support she needs?

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #5 posted 07/12/18 7:26am

jjhunsecker

avatar

Benni- We know you have a good heart. I wouldn't advise that you quit a job that you need, no matter what. The needs of your family always come first (I'm currently unemployed myself). What I would do is write a letter to the corporate office, and get as many of your co-workers to sign it, to express how you feel about what the CEO said, and how upset and offended and even ashamed you feel , about a job and a place you love and work hard for. None of you are to blame for this idiot. And you shouldn't have to pay for his stupidity.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #6 posted 07/12/18 7:41am

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

I lke JJ's idea.

Schnatter resigned in shame and it would appear because of his own doing (his social offenses/racist talk) the company's stock went plummeting. This guy's words do not reflect the views of the entire company - people like yourself - but admittedly I have not bought pizza from PJ since Schnatter spoke against ACA and said he would raise his prices because he did not like that he had to pay-in for employee health care.

I see your dilemma. I like the letter idea! I agree, having it signed by as many employees as you can get would be a great way of expressing yourself about this matter. Make sure you alert a news agency (AP) about this letter as well.



***I was also wondering - since you are a part-time driver - would you consider a Lyft or Uber type of job? A friend of mine who is finishing up grad school became a Lyft driver and loves it. He chooses his own days/hours and he says he is making more than his former part-time job so he only wiht Lyft now.

"'Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.'' - Thomas Jefferson
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #7 posted 07/12/18 7:42am

2freaky4church
1

avatar

Shitty pizza

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #8 posted 07/12/18 7:42am

benni

jjhunsecker said:

Benni- We know you have a good heart. I wouldn't advise that you quit a job that you need, no matter what. The needs of your family always come first (I'm currently unemployed myself). What I would do is write a letter to the corporate office, and get as many of your co-workers to sign it, to express how you feel about what the CEO said, and how upset and offended and even ashamed you feel , about a job and a place you love and work hard for. None of you are to blame for this idiot. And you shouldn't have to pay for his stupidity.


After talking with Christenna last night, I'm not going to quit. She had a valid point when she said that if I left then I was giving power to his comment. There really are some great people that work there and they deserve so much better than this. There's this young kid, he's 17 years old (goes to school with my son) and is in JRTOC. He is a GOOD kid. He works very hard and every time I go to work, he comes up to me and gives me a hug. People like Schnatter or Trump would look at him and think "thug" I'm sure, but I look at him and see my son in him. This just hurts and I don't know why, except that it is personal coming from the ex-CEO of the company that we work for. Christenna's eyes last night, when we were talking, the pain. It's just heartbreaking and I want to do something for her and my other co-workers to show my support. But I'm not sure what she needs...

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #9 posted 07/12/18 7:45am

benni

DiminutiveRocker said:

I lke JJ's idea.

Schnatter resigned in shame and it would appear because of his own doing (his social offenses/racist talk) the company's stock went plummeting. This guy's words do not reflect the views of the entire company - people like yourself - but admittedly I have not bought pizza from PJ since Schnatter spoke against ACA and said he would raise his prices because he did not like that he had to pay-in for employee health care.

I see your dilemma. I like the letter idea! I agree, having it signed by as many employees as you can get would be a great way of expressing yourself about this matter. Make sure you alert a news agency (AP) about this letter as well.



***I was also wondering - since you are a part-time driver - would you consider a Lyft or Uber type of job? A friend of mine who is finishing up grad school became a Lyft driver and loves it. He chooses his own days/hours and he says he is making more than his former part-time job so he only wiht Lyft now.


I'm working on a letter. I do agree that is an excellent suggestion.

As for Lyft, I'm afraid my car isn't in very good shape to take people places. It gets me through my two jobs, but I've got almost 200,000 miles on it now and it makes an awful racket.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #10 posted 07/12/18 7:49am

jjhunsecker

avatar

benni said:

DiminutiveRocker said:

I lke JJ's idea.

Schnatter resigned in shame and it would appear because of his own doing (his social offenses/racist talk) the company's stock went plummeting. This guy's words do not reflect the views of the entire company - people like yourself - but admittedly I have not bought pizza from PJ since Schnatter spoke against ACA and said he would raise his prices because he did not like that he had to pay-in for employee health care.

I see your dilemma. I like the letter idea! I agree, having it signed by as many employees as you can get would be a great way of expressing yourself about this matter. Make sure you alert a news agency (AP) about this letter as well.



***I was also wondering - since you are a part-time driver - would you consider a Lyft or Uber type of job? A friend of mine who is finishing up grad school became a Lyft driver and loves it. He chooses his own days/hours and he says he is making more than his former part-time job so he only wiht Lyft now.


I'm working on a letter. I do agree that is an excellent suggestion.

As for Lyft, I'm afraid my car isn't in very good shape to take people places. It gets me through my two jobs, but I've got almost 200,000 miles on it now and it makes an awful racket.

And maybe post the letter on Facebook and Twitter and other social media if you have accounts, for maximum exposure.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #11 posted 07/12/18 7:50am

maplenpg

benni said:

jjhunsecker said:

Benni- We know you have a good heart. I wouldn't advise that you quit a job that you need, no matter what. The needs of your family always come first (I'm currently unemployed myself). What I would do is write a letter to the corporate office, and get as many of your co-workers to sign it, to express how you feel about what the CEO said, and how upset and offended and even ashamed you feel , about a job and a place you love and work hard for. None of you are to blame for this idiot. And you shouldn't have to pay for his stupidity.


After talking with Christenna last night, I'm not going to quit. She had a valid point when she said that if I left then I was giving power to his comment. There really are some great people that work there and they deserve so much better than this. There's this young kid, he's 17 years old (goes to school with my son) and is in JRTOC. He is a GOOD kid. He works very hard and every time I go to work, he comes up to me and gives me a hug. People like Schnatter or Trump would look at him and think "thug" I'm sure, but I look at him and see my son in him. This just hurts and I don't know why, except that it is personal coming from the ex-CEO of the company that we work for. Christenna's eyes last night, when we were talking, the pain. It's just heartbreaking and I want to do something for her and my other co-workers to show my support. But I'm not sure what she needs...

Sounds to me like you just being yourself is exactly the medicine she needs. Hugs, warmth, love and unity will win over some ignorant idiot's comments. I'm sure she feels your support through your words and actions, there is no need to feel like you need to do more.

It never ceases to amaze me how cruel humans can be against fellow humans and animals, especially when in the pursuit of money and power.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #12 posted 07/12/18 7:57am

benni

maplenpg said:

benni said:


After talking with Christenna last night, I'm not going to quit. She had a valid point when she said that if I left then I was giving power to his comment. There really are some great people that work there and they deserve so much better than this. There's this young kid, he's 17 years old (goes to school with my son) and is in JRTOC. He is a GOOD kid. He works very hard and every time I go to work, he comes up to me and gives me a hug. People like Schnatter or Trump would look at him and think "thug" I'm sure, but I look at him and see my son in him. This just hurts and I don't know why, except that it is personal coming from the ex-CEO of the company that we work for. Christenna's eyes last night, when we were talking, the pain. It's just heartbreaking and I want to do something for her and my other co-workers to show my support. But I'm not sure what she needs...

Sounds to me like you just being yourself is exactly the medicine she needs. Hugs, warmth, love and unity will win over some ignorant idiot's comments. I'm sure she feels your support through your words and actions, there is no need to feel like you need to do more.


hug Thank you. I don't know why I feel the need to do more except maybe it's the social worker in me that wants to fix things. I hate to see anyone hurt. I have to work tonight, so if she's in, I'll make sure to give her an extra big hug.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #13 posted 07/12/18 7:58am

DiminutiveRock
er

avatar

benni said:

DiminutiveRocker said:

I lke JJ's idea.

Schnatter resigned in shame and it would appear because of his own doing (his social offenses/racist talk) the company's stock went plummeting. This guy's words do not reflect the views of the entire company - people like yourself - but admittedly I have not bought pizza from PJ since Schnatter spoke against ACA and said he would raise his prices because he did not like that he had to pay-in for employee health care.

I see your dilemma. I like the letter idea! I agree, having it signed by as many employees as you can get would be a great way of expressing yourself about this matter. Make sure you alert a news agency (AP) about this letter as well.



***I was also wondering - since you are a part-time driver - would you consider a Lyft or Uber type of job? A friend of mine who is finishing up grad school became a Lyft driver and loves it. He chooses his own days/hours and he says he is making more than his former part-time job so he only wiht Lyft now.


I'm working on a letter. I do agree that is an excellent suggestion.

As for Lyft, I'm afraid my car isn't in very good shape to take people places. It gets me through my two jobs, but I've got almost 200,000 miles on it now and it makes an awful racket.


Co-sign on the social media idea - glad you are writing the letter ! smile

My friend normally drives a little Fiat so he says he rents a car (3-4 days a week) and pays for it with his Lyft money and he says still makes enough to cover that cost and take home what he needs. Just a suggestion.

hug good luck, Benni!





[Edited 7/12/18 7:58am]

"'Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.'' - Thomas Jefferson
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #14 posted 07/12/18 8:02am

jjhunsecker

avatar

benni said:

jjhunsecker said:

Benni- We know you have a good heart. I wouldn't advise that you quit a job that you need, no matter what. The needs of your family always come first (I'm currently unemployed myself). What I would do is write a letter to the corporate office, and get as many of your co-workers to sign it, to express how you feel about what the CEO said, and how upset and offended and even ashamed you feel , about a job and a place you love and work hard for. None of you are to blame for this idiot. And you shouldn't have to pay for his stupidity.


After talking with Christenna last night, I'm not going to quit. She had a valid point when she said that if I left then I was giving power to his comment. There really are some great people that work there and they deserve so much better than this. There's this young kid, he's 17 years old (goes to school with my son) and is in JRTOC. He is a GOOD kid. He works very hard and every time I go to work, he comes up to me and gives me a hug. People like Schnatter or Trump would look at him and think "thug" I'm sure, but I look at him and see my son in him. This just hurts and I don't know why, except that it is personal coming from the ex-CEO of the company that we work for. Christenna's eyes last night, when we were talking, the pain. It's just heartbreaking and I want to do something for her and my other co-workers to show my support. But I'm not sure what she needs...

And remember, this guy is rich. Even though he doesn't have a job anymore, he's never going to really suffer.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #15 posted 07/12/18 8:11am

2elijah

avatar

benni said:



2elijah said:


I believe you have a good heart and soul, and it easy to understand why you feel that way, and if you feel uncomfortable working in a place where the CEO feels that way about people you work around, then do what you feel is right for you. I had no idea the CEO of Papa John was so racist, yet many Black Americans have supported his business for years. I'm pretty sure he is not the only one, who runs a major company and has that type of racist attitude towards Black Americans. There are many within various places of employment, like him, so he probably won’t be the last, wherever you work. All I can say is do what feels right for you. The good thing is that he resigned. The only person who could change his racist attitude is him. You’re not him and the good thing is that he resigned. The problem is that when business owners like him, make those kinds of comments, it does not help improve race relations in this country, and it just plays to the racist/stereotype generalizations this society often labels many. It also brings those he offended, out to protest and boycott businesses, with a possibility of shutting that business down and innocent employees losing their jobs, over one ignorant, idiot’s insecurities and hatred towards another race. If you fear that maybe someone will take the CEO’s racist rant out on you, then I can understand why that could be a possible reason to leave as well. [Edited 7/12/18 7:04am]


2elijah, I've always respected your opinion, so want to ask: If you were working in a company in which your CEO had made those types of racist comments, how would you want your co-workers to support you? I want to do something for my co-workers, especially my manager, to show my support and let them know they aren't alone. And to let them know that not everyone is like Schnatter, though every day the news is showing there are more like him than not. It's just not right, 2elijah. It's just not. And I will never be able to wrap my head around how anyone can believe that way or act that way. Christenna, my manager, is the sweetest, most loving woman I've met and to look at her as anything less than that just because of the color of her skin, just doesn't make sense to me. But how can I show her the support she needs?


Thank you so much for that and I appreciate you. hug I’m pretty sure your manager and co-workers are already aware that you are nothing like that CEO. You are already on the right track just acknowledging his comments were racist and hateful.

There really isn’t much for you to prove to them, and why do you feel that there is something you have to prove? You’ve done nothing wrong.

That CEO is the only one who can change his racist attitude. Even his resignation won’t change him overnight. It has to be up to him. Just continue being who you are with the good heart and soul that you already have. You should not have to carry guilt for someone else’s racist attitude, beliefs or behavior, because you’re from the same racial group as he is. He is an individual and so are you. Only he is responsible for his actions, not you.
[Edited 7/12/18 8:16am]
FEARLESS
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #16 posted 07/12/18 8:11am

RodeoSchro

avatar

He resigned as CEO last year after he criticized NFL playes for kneeling.

Yesterday, he resigned as Chairman of the Board - and from the board entirely - for using the N word.

So I think that other than owning shares in the company, he's out of it completely? If so, that ought to help make things better for you and everyone else at Papa John's.

EDIT - He stayed on the board of directors.

Right now might be a good time to consider an employee-led buy out. The stock price is down, and the company appears rudderless (while I'm sure it isn't, perception is reality). But if your location is indicative of the company's employee workforce, it's stacked with great people.

I'd suggest you ask someone in the financial industry about the prospects of an employee purchase of the company (usually called an "ESOP" for Employee Stock Ownership Plan, but there are other forms of employee purchases). What have you got to lose?

As Prince said, "Set your goals high, high as the sky"! I believe in you and I know you can do it!

.

[Edited 7/12/18 8:53am]

Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's paladin
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #17 posted 07/12/18 8:14am

2elijah

avatar

jjhunsecker said:

Benni- We know you have a good heart. I wouldn't advise that you quit a job that you need, no matter what. The needs of your family always come first (I'm currently unemployed myself). What I would do is write a letter to the corporate office, and get as many of your co-workers to sign it, to express how you feel about what the CEO said, and how upset and offended and even ashamed you feel , about a job and a place you love and work hard for. None of you are to blame for this idiot. And you shouldn't have to pay for his stupidity.


Agree. Unfortunately, there will always be bad fish in the bowl no matter where you work. Don’t let someone else’s insecurities and ignorance take anything away from you.
FEARLESS
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #18 posted 07/12/18 8:18am

2elijah

avatar

benni said:



maplenpg said:




benni said:




After talking with Christenna last night, I'm not going to quit. She had a valid point when she said that if I left then I was giving power to his comment. There really are some great people that work there and they deserve so much better than this. There's this young kid, he's 17 years old (goes to school with my son) and is in JRTOC. He is a GOOD kid. He works very hard and every time I go to work, he comes up to me and gives me a hug. People like Schnatter or Trump would look at him and think "thug" I'm sure, but I look at him and see my son in him. This just hurts and I don't know why, except that it is personal coming from the ex-CEO of the company that we work for. Christenna's eyes last night, when we were talking, the pain. It's just heartbreaking and I want to do something for her and my other co-workers to show my support. But I'm not sure what she needs...



Sounds to me like you just being yourself is exactly the medicine she needs. Hugs, warmth, love and unity will win over some ignorant idiot's comments. I'm sure she feels your support through your words and actions, there is no need to feel like you need to do more.




hug Thank you. I don't know why I feel the need to do more except maybe it's the social worker in me that wants to fix things. I hate to see anyone hurt. I have to work tonight, so if she's in, I'll make sure to give her an extra big hug.


You’re doing enough just being the kind and compassionate human being that you are. smile
FEARLESS
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #19 posted 07/12/18 8:56am

benni

2elijah said:

benni said:


2elijah, I've always respected your opinion, so want to ask: If you were working in a company in which your CEO had made those types of racist comments, how would you want your co-workers to support you? I want to do something for my co-workers, especially my manager, to show my support and let them know they aren't alone. And to let them know that not everyone is like Schnatter, though every day the news is showing there are more like him than not. It's just not right, 2elijah. It's just not. And I will never be able to wrap my head around how anyone can believe that way or act that way. Christenna, my manager, is the sweetest, most loving woman I've met and to look at her as anything less than that just because of the color of her skin, just doesn't make sense to me. But how can I show her the support she needs?

Thank you so much for that and I appreciate you. hug I’m pretty sure your manager and co-workers are already aware that you are nothing like that CEO. You are already on the right track just acknowledging his comments were racist and hateful. There really isn’t much for you to prove to them, and why do you feel that there is something you have to prove? You’ve done nothing wrong. That CEO is the only one who can change his racist attitude. Even his resignation won’t change him overnight. It has to be up to him. Just continue being who you are with the good heart and soul that you already have. You should not have to carry guilt for someone else’s racist attitude, beliefs or behavior, because you’re from the same racial group as he is. He is an individual and so are you. Only he is responsible for his actions, not you. [Edited 7/12/18 8:16am]


It's not a matter of proving anything to them, but of offering them support. They know who and how I am and I've never felt a need to prove anything to them. I'm always been just me. maplenpg, stating what she did, helped a lot. She's right. All I can do is be who I am and they know where my heart is. I just hate seeing anyone hurt, especially people I care about, and I'm sure there is some deep, childhood, psychological thing, but I always want to fix things, make things better. What I forget is that sometimes, the best way to make things better is to just keep being me and there isn't anything else to be done. Thank you, 2elijah!

Thank you, everyone! grouphug

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #20 posted 07/12/18 8:57am

benni

RodeoSchro said:

He resigned as CEO last year after he criticized NFL playes for kneeling.

Yesterday, he resigned as Chairman of the Board - and from the board entirely - for using the N word.

So I think that other than owning shares in the company, he's out of it completely? If so, that ought to help make things better for you and everyone else at Papa John's.

EDIT - He stayed on the board of directors.

Right now might be a good time to consider an employee-led buy out. The stock price is down, and the company appears rudderless (while I'm sure it isn't, perception is reality). But if your location is indicative of the company's employee workforce, it's stacked with great people.

I'd suggest you ask someone in the financial industry about the prospects of an employee purchase of the company (usually called an "ESOP" for Employee Stock Ownership Plan, but there are other forms of employee purchases). What have you got to lose?

As Prince said, "Set your goals high, high as the sky"! I believe in you and I know you can do it!

.

[Edited 7/12/18 8:53am]


That has to change. He can't be allowed to stay on the board of directors.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #21 posted 07/12/18 9:15am

poppys

benni said:

RodeoSchro said:

He resigned as CEO last year after he criticized NFL playes for kneeling.

Yesterday, he resigned as Chairman of the Board - and from the board entirely - for using the N word.

So I think that other than owning shares in the company, he's out of it completely? If so, that ought to help make things better for you and everyone else at Papa John's.

EDIT - He stayed on the board of directors.

Right now might be a good time to consider an employee-led buy out. The stock price is down, and the company appears rudderless (while I'm sure it isn't, perception is reality). But if your location is indicative of the company's employee workforce, it's stacked with great people.

I'd suggest you ask someone in the financial industry about the prospects of an employee purchase of the company (usually called an "ESOP" for Employee Stock Ownership Plan, but there are other forms of employee purchases). What have you got to lose?

As Prince said, "Set your goals high, high as the sky"! I believe in you and I know you can do it!


That has to change. He can't be allowed to stay on the board of directors.

Agree.

And agree with everyone here. Don't let that racist man put you in financial jeopardy. Stay and fight from within with your amazing heart. They need you. "Don't let the bastards get you down". hug

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #22 posted 07/12/18 10:54am

maplenpg

benni said:

2elijah said:

benni said: Thank you so much for that and I appreciate you. hug I’m pretty sure your manager and co-workers are already aware that you are nothing like that CEO. You are already on the right track just acknowledging his comments were racist and hateful. There really isn’t much for you to prove to them, and why do you feel that there is something you have to prove? You’ve done nothing wrong. That CEO is the only one who can change his racist attitude. Even his resignation won’t change him overnight. It has to be up to him. Just continue being who you are with the good heart and soul that you already have. You should not have to carry guilt for someone else’s racist attitude, beliefs or behavior, because you’re from the same racial group as he is. He is an individual and so are you. Only he is responsible for his actions, not you. [Edited 7/12/18 8:16am]


It's not a matter of proving anything to them, but of offering them support. They know who and how I am and I've never felt a need to prove anything to them. I'm always been just me. maplenpg, stating what she did, helped a lot. She's right. All I can do is be who I am and they know where my heart is. I just hate seeing anyone hurt, especially people I care about, and I'm sure there is some deep, childhood, psychological thing, but I always want to fix things, make things better. What I forget is that sometimes, the best way to make things better is to just keep being me and there isn't anything else to be done. Thank you, 2elijah!

Thank you, everyone! grouphug

hug

There will always be people in the world who spew out vile and hateful things, whilst enjoying a job that pays them a salary that ensures they'll never understand the consequences of their words. However, there are others in the world who let their heart lead them, and whilst those people might never become rich or powerful, they sure as hell make the world a better place.

It never ceases to amaze me how cruel humans can be against fellow humans and animals, especially when in the pursuit of money and power.
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #23 posted 07/12/18 11:10am

uPtoWnNY

2freaky4church1 said:

Shitty pizza

It's not even real pizza.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #24 posted 07/12/18 12:01pm

2elijah

avatar

benni said:



2elijah said:


benni said:



2elijah, I've always respected your opinion, so want to ask: If you were working in a company in which your CEO had made those types of racist comments, how would you want your co-workers to support you? I want to do something for my co-workers, especially my manager, to show my support and let them know they aren't alone. And to let them know that not everyone is like Schnatter, though every day the news is showing there are more like him than not. It's just not right, 2elijah. It's just not. And I will never be able to wrap my head around how anyone can believe that way or act that way. Christenna, my manager, is the sweetest, most loving woman I've met and to look at her as anything less than that just because of the color of her skin, just doesn't make sense to me. But how can I show her the support she needs?



Thank you so much for that and I appreciate you. hug I’m pretty sure your manager and co-workers are already aware that you are nothing like that CEO. You are already on the right track just acknowledging his comments were racist and hateful. There really isn’t much for you to prove to them, and why do you feel that there is something you have to prove? You’ve done nothing wrong. That CEO is the only one who can change his racist attitude. Even his resignation won’t change him overnight. It has to be up to him. Just continue being who you are with the good heart and soul that you already have. You should not have to carry guilt for someone else’s racist attitude, beliefs or behavior, because you’re from the same racial group as he is. He is an individual and so are you. Only he is responsible for his actions, not you. [Edited 7/12/18 8:16am]


It's not a matter of proving anything to them, but of offering them support. They know who and how I am and I've never felt a need to prove anything to them. I'm always been just me. maplenpg, stating what she did, helped a lot. She's right. All I can do is be who I am and they know where my heart is. I just hate seeing anyone hurt, especially people I care about, and I'm sure there is some deep, childhood, psychological thing, but I always want to fix things, make things better. What I forget is that sometimes, the best way to make things better is to just keep being me and there isn't anything else to be done. Thank you, 2elijah!

Thank you, everyone! grouphug


Maybe I used the wrong term (prove). What I meant was that you already have the right medicine by being who you are. That medicine is the support your co-workers will and I’m sure appreciate about you. I wish you the best in your decision. smile
FEARLESS
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #25 posted 07/13/18 5:55am

deebee

avatar

benni said:

https://www.cbsnews.com/n...ur-n-word/


I need some advice regarding this topic, too. As I've mentioned before, my day job is as a social worker. I work with elderly and disabled individuals who are on Medicaid and want to remain home rather than going into a nursing home or other facility. We put services in place to allow them to remain as independent as possible in their own home.

However, my financial situation is such that I have to work a second job. My second job is as a delivery driver for Papa John's. After I read this report today, I almost called out tonight and was going to turn in my uniform and car topper. There are other jobs available, but I don't know if they would be willing to work with me on my schedule the way my manager at Papa John's has (given my health, having two kids at home, etc.). My manager there is a young, 20 something African American female and she is just way toooooo sweet. I absolutely adore her and she calls me the "mom" of the store. (I'm the oldest female working there and since I'm also a social worker, the young kids usually come to me for advice.)

I did talk with her about the above news article and I could tell how deeply it affected her. Not only was she hurt, because she puts her heart and soul into this position and has been proud to be the manager, but she was angry, too. Justifiably so. And I was angry on her behalf, other co-workers' behalfs, and just in general, because this should not be an issue in this day and age. She asked me to stay on, for her, but at the same time, I don't want to support this kind of racist attitude from the CEO/owner.

Another friend on twitter, suggested that I write a letter and have everyone at work sign it, stating our concerns with the statement, how it effects our work environment and pride in the company, and how these kinds of statements hurt the employees. I think this is an excellent suggestion and plan to implement it, but wanted to find other ways to support my co-workers, let them know how very much they are all loved and appreciated, while also getting the message across to the higher ups that this behavior is not acceptable. Any advice would be welcome, except the "quit your job". I was going to do that tonight, but after talking with the manager, I realize she is not in as good of a position as I am to be able to just quit and find another position. I want to be there for her if I can.


I'd echo what others have said: that you shouldn't feel any obligation to resign, as that would hurt you more than it would hurt the company (which would simply replace you and carry on as normal). My advice would be that any action should be collective, as that's the only way one can have any strength as an employee. A good move would be to consult with your union rep, if you are a member of a union (and, if not, consider joining one). They could articulate a clear position of condemnation on behalf of all their members over this - and also link that to other issues employees of colour, and others, may face at work (e.g. pay, conditions, flexibility, etc). Acting collectively means you're protected and your voice is much stronger.

"Not everything that is faced can be changed; but nothing can be changed until it is faced." - James Baldwin
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #26 posted 07/13/18 7:55am

2freaky4church
1

avatar

Racism is coming out all over. awful

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #27 posted 07/13/18 9:45am

Ugot2shakesumt
hin

avatar

deebee said:

benni said:

https://www.cbsnews.com/n...ur-n-word/


I need some advice regarding this topic, too. As I've mentioned before, my day job is as a social worker. I work with elderly and disabled individuals who are on Medicaid and want to remain home rather than going into a nursing home or other facility. We put services in place to allow them to remain as independent as possible in their own home.

However, my financial situation is such that I have to work a second job. My second job is as a delivery driver for Papa John's. After I read this report today, I almost called out tonight and was going to turn in my uniform and car topper. There are other jobs available, but I don't know if they would be willing to work with me on my schedule the way my manager at Papa John's has (given my health, having two kids at home, etc.). My manager there is a young, 20 something African American female and she is just way toooooo sweet. I absolutely adore her and she calls me the "mom" of the store. (I'm the oldest female working there and since I'm also a social worker, the young kids usually come to me for advice.)

I did talk with her about the above news article and I could tell how deeply it affected her. Not only was she hurt, because she puts her heart and soul into this position and has been proud to be the manager, but she was angry, too. Justifiably so. And I was angry on her behalf, other co-workers' behalfs, and just in general, because this should not be an issue in this day and age. She asked me to stay on, for her, but at the same time, I don't want to support this kind of racist attitude from the CEO/owner.

Another friend on twitter, suggested that I write a letter and have everyone at work sign it, stating our concerns with the statement, how it effects our work environment and pride in the company, and how these kinds of statements hurt the employees. I think this is an excellent suggestion and plan to implement it, but wanted to find other ways to support my co-workers, let them know how very much they are all loved and appreciated, while also getting the message across to the higher ups that this behavior is not acceptable. Any advice would be welcome, except the "quit your job". I was going to do that tonight, but after talking with the manager, I realize she is not in as good of a position as I am to be able to just quit and find another position. I want to be there for her if I can.


I'd echo what others have said: that you shouldn't feel any obligation to resign, as that would hurt you more than it would hurt the company (which would simply replace you and carry on as normal). My advice would be that any action should be collective, as that's the only way one can have any strength as an employee. A good move would be to consult with your union rep, if you are a member of a union (and, if not, consider joining one). They could articulate a clear position of condemnation on behalf of all their members over this - and also link that to other issues employees of colour, and others, may face at work (e.g. pay, conditions, flexibility, etc). Acting collectively means you're protected and your voice is much stronger.

There are not many unions left in the US, and those that are still there are like school unions are continually being undermined and strong-armed out of existence.

Crooked Donnie. Lock him up!
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #28 posted 07/15/18 7:12am

RodeoSchro

avatar

Second Funkiest White Man in America

P&R's paladin
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #29 posted 07/15/18 7:57am

poppys

RodeoSchro said:

The dude is unhinged:

https://deadspin.com/pizz...1827604805


The dude is a stone cold racist blaming the fact that he is one on an ad agency. He needs to be removed from the board. His image needs to be removed from all the franchises. The (crappy) pizza needs to be mass boycotted until these goals are achieved.

He is getting even more publicity with stuff like this interview with a white radio guy and Deadspin calling him a dipshit. That's what we call idiots in high school, not adult racist CEO's. They are minimalizing, shocking huh?

I still think benni should keep her job for financial reasons, the topic of this thread, until she is able to change her situation. It's not like there aren't more employers out there just like him.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Page 1 of 2 12>
  New topic   Printable     (Log in to 'subscribe' to this topic)
« Previous topic  Next topic »
Forums > Politics & Religion > Papa John's