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Thread started 09/26/18 3:37am

hausofmoi7

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Romanticizing Poverty

“Even the poor have something very chic about them.” – Karl Lagerfeld, creative director for Chanel and Fendi, discussing India’s slum-dwelling, “elegant” women
https://www.google.com.au...class/amp/



After watching Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s kitschy film Amélie and taking in its bright colors and even brighter vision of Paris and love, it’s easy to want to drop everything and find a tiny apartment in Montmartre. There, you could ride around on a one-speed bicycle, work at a charming brasserie, and find love, perhaps even sport a cute lil’ bob like Miss Audrey Tautou (God bless her and that haircut).

Don’t we all pine for the simple life? The life of the baker or shoemaker or even the Parisian waitress like Amélie? After all, it seems so simple. When the rich, or even the middle class, imagine the lives of the working class or poor, they envision an existence that is uncomplicated, void of stress, pure, and moral.

In any society, there is a working/service class, a sort of “underbelly” as Zola would call it; but, often, the middle and upper classes view it not as miserable, merely as an alternative life path on which the usual pressures of job promotions and performance reviews are swapped for a generic routine characterized by simplicity and morality. Waitressing in a chic Montmartre brasserie? Simple? Yep. Then, ah, how romantic.

Shame though. This equation doesn’t always add up.

One can see this simplification in recent literature and film, where the working class is generally depicted as either:

Deeply moralistic and contented with their socioeconomic position (probably in order to mitigate any guilt the more privileged class might have). Ex. Slumdog Millionaire, Beasts of the Southern Wild, The Son, Good Will Hunting
-or-

In need of assistance which is often provided by a white, wealthy character of higher social status. Ex. The Help, The Soloist , The Dark Knight Rises
Think of the typical narrative scenario where the New York banker might go to, say, Indonesia on vacation only to meet a poor fisherman who is “truly living” life, finding out that — gasp — the fisherman is the “richer” of the two. The fisherman’s life is simple, and isn’t it just so darn beautiful the way he can take in the setting sun before he runs home to his family, rather than worrying about duping people into buying overpriced derivatives?

Oh, but wait, the Indonesian fisherman doesn’t have any teeth because he can’t afford the dentist. And his “home” is actually a straw shack. His wife is constantly distressed, and he’s always anxious because he knows he will always struggle to feed his children. Days often end in fights and the constant, crushing poverty seems too much to handle; but he wills himself to get up each morning, hoping, praying that he’ll catch enough fish to keep his family alive.

But, wow, he’s good at enjoying the sunset, right?

When we idealize poverty, we confound simplicity with happiness, and that is both naïve and, more often than not, quite offensive. While I’m not necessarily advocating consumerism.

Let me explain:

Poverty is not just romanticized in media, but also in daily life. There is the idea of the “boho” or bohemian — the struggling writer, painter or otherwise artistic individual — who taps into this working class ethos of simplicity and goodness, pushing aside the capitalist framework he is seemingly forced to accept. The bohemian puts passion above material comfort, and, in many cases, it’s a noble pursuit.

However, the seemingly similar but in fact quite different idea of the“bobo” or bourgeois-bohemian is a more despicable offshoot of the bohemian. Bobos take the daily “simplicity” of the bohemian and the working class and combine it with a financial security that members of the latter are never privy to.

You tend to find bobos where wealthy young people mix — at East Coast private schools like my own university, NYU, for example. These bobos pretend to be poor when they’re actually extremely rich. (It’s surprising how often I’ve confused a homeless person in Washington Square Park with a student whose father is a corporate lawyer and whose “Kerouac-inspired slum residence” is really just a Lower East Side one-bedroom that’s, in fact, very safe, well-appointed, and seemingly decorated by Zooey Deschanel — Chinese lanterns and all.)

The ultimate representation of this bobo lifestyle is the store Urban Outfitters whose main demographic, as explicitly stated by founder and president Dick Haynes, is the “upscale homeless.”

Indeed, for many of the wealthy, especially the young wealthy, poverty is “cool.” The Live Below the Line campaign, which challenged well-off participants to survive on $1.75/day for five days to demonstrate how hard it is to live below Canada’s poverty line, was perhaps admirable in theory, but in practice, it was pretty much nonsense. Everyone participating knew it would be over in five days and could go back to gawking at way-too-large savings accounts, never knowing what it feels like to be entirely controlled by money and a measly, ever-dwindling balance.

Poverty can also be invoked as a vehicle for escapism. In Woody Allen’sBlue Jasmine, for instance, Cate Blanchett’s character, a wealthy Manhattanite, loses much of her fortune and moves to San Francisco to live a drastically less privileged, but more enjoyable life. Both travel and monetary disadvantage are wrapped up in this fetishized vision of leading a less-moneyed life, and it’s fascinating to see how social class jumping can be interpreted as a kind of escape, akin to traveling to a different country, which often seems different, fresh and exciting, but which quickly wears thin with the passage of time and one’s familiarization with the social milieu or “exotic” locale.

When people speak of the poor or working class in this escapist context, they are responding to a brief desire to change — ostensibly, to “simplify” — their situation, which may be complex and stressful, but in the grand scheme of things, is more enjoyable and comfortable than the less privileged alternative regardless of their admirable intentions to “help.”

Instead, we revel in the whitewashed depictions provided by the media or in the dreamy fraud perpetuated by bobo culture; we elevate and desire “the simple life,” while passing on the whole, you know, poverty part.
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #1 posted 09/26/18 4:21am

hausofmoi7

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Jean-Pierre Jeunet is actually a huge inspiration of mine, I love his movies.
I also actually cried at the end of Slumdog Milionaire because he loved her more than anything else in the world and found her at all costs.
I’m not quite sure if ‘Slumdog Milionaire’ actually romanticizes poverty like the other examples provided do.
Slumdog Milionare didn’t try and romanticize sex work and the reality and circumstances of why people are left with no other option, or sometimes even are forced into against their will.
Rich people or upper class people don’t have to do sex work, nor do their family members.
They don’t have to, nor would they want themselves or their family members to have to be in a position where they had to take up sex work.
You can and should support sex workers rights vehemently, but do so without romanticising it.
Slumdog did try to show the reality of the caste system and what that reality amounts to for the underclass.

Regardless, this is a really important and well written piece about romanticising poverty.
Poverty is not something that people who have not lived it understand fully.


Any thoughts?





.
[Edited 9/26/18 10:50am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #2 posted 09/26/18 6:19am

hausofmoi7

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“Romanticizing Poverty” Provides Legitimacy to Social Inequality

https://www.google.com.au...354948/amp
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #3 posted 09/26/18 6:32am

hausofmoi7

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read the article in full.
It’s about romanticising poverty, not the visibility of poor people.
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #4 posted 09/26/18 6:57am

NorthC

It goes back even further. Jesus said it's easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to go to the Kingdom of Heaven. The Church has a long tradition of praising poverty. The new pope's name Franciscus is no coincidence. Unfortunately, the Church doesn't always practice what it preaches.
I may disagree with everything you say, but I will defend your right to say it.
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Reply #5 posted 09/26/18 7:12am

hausofmoi7

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NorthC said:

It goes back even further. Jesus said it's easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to go to the Kingdom of Heaven.

That’s not romanticising poverty.
That sounds like a precursor to Marxist philosophy.





.
[Edited 9/26/18 7:29am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #6 posted 09/26/18 7:20am

poppys

Good thread hausofmoi7.

Something I noticed here is it is no longer called hunger. It is called food insecure. Removes some of the urgency of what it is to actually be hungry. A clinical and socioeconomic substitute that doesn't tug at the heartstrings (of those who still have them) the way hungry children does.

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Reply #7 posted 09/26/18 7:27am

maplenpg

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hausofmoi7 said:

“Romanticizing Poverty” Provides Legitimacy to Social Inequality https://www.google.com.au...354948/amp

This is a great article and the visual comparisons are striking- thanks for posting. I think the reality of poverty is full of depressing hopelessness, which would make for grim viewing and probably wouldn't put bums on seats at the movies. There is a circular element to poverty as well which politicians never seem to make any real efforts to break so it carries on and on.

I can't scorn those that do try the 5 days on a tiny amount of money though, only those that finish it with comments such as, "it was easy", "I could live like that" etc... and I'd like to think that isn't the majority. If it makes someone give an extra few pounds to charity, or food to foodbanks or the homeless then I can't see it's something to be frowned at.


I think poverty means different things to different people, I do think it's possible to understand it if you haven't experienced it, but only if you work closely with those living it day to day - and as I said, the reality is grim and depressing. Social media doesn't help - I quite enjoy some of the van life videos on YouTube but, yes, I'm in complete agreement that it romantises the simple nomadic life, whilst ignoring the fact that many have to live in their vehicles, or worse on the streets, not by choice but by circumstance and poverty.


I think we live in a world where it's much easier to turn a blind eye to cruelty, injustice, and to poverty, than to face it full on, shocking as it might be. And yet it is only by accepting the grim truths and realities that we can start discussing what to do about them.



If love is the answer, what was the question? - Carter USM.
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Reply #8 posted 09/26/18 7:35am

2freaky4church
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Unless people are willing to be poor themselves they should not make us be poor, just not right. I'm semi poor but don't give a shit because I am not a victim.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #9 posted 09/26/18 7:50am

OnlyNDaUsa

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It's called socialism.
Anyone for banning the AR15 must be on the side of the criminal as once banned only criminals will have them.
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Reply #10 posted 09/26/18 7:54am

OnlyNDaUsa

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hausofmoi7 said:

NorthC said:

It goes back even further. Jesus said it's easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to go to the Kingdom of Heaven.

That’s not romanticising poverty.
That sounds like a precursor to Marxist philosophy.


.
[Edited 9/26/18 7:29am]


It is indeed... Shared misery until no one knows any better as the tippy top has all the benefit. And as always the gap is larger than under capitalism.
Anyone for banning the AR15 must be on the side of the criminal as once banned only criminals will have them.
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Reply #11 posted 09/26/18 8:10am

2freaky4church
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You want me to live in miserty buddy.

"My motherfucker's so cool sheep count him."
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Reply #12 posted 09/26/18 8:44am

hausofmoi7

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OnlyNDaUsa said:

hausofmoi7 said:


That’s not romanticising poverty.
That sounds like a precursor to Marxist philosophy.


.
[Edited 9/26/18 7:29am]


It is indeed... Shared misery until no one knows any better as the tippy top has all the benefit. And as always the gap is larger than under capitalism.

Socialism is about eradicating poverty.
Not about romanticising or shaming it either.

A Decentralised form of socialism would alleviate the issue you are concerned about.
Or you could also just get rid of the monetary system completely.
Either option would help with the issue of hoarding wealth, which creates poverty within the current system.





.
[Edited 9/26/18 9:31am]
"It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non-violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection" – Lesley Hazleton on the first muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #13 posted 09/26/18 9:03am

jjhunsecker

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hausofmoi7 said:

read the article in full. It’s about romanticising poverty, not the visibility of poor people. .

That may be for artists, that people "romanticize" their struggle to create and be true to their art at all costs. I don't know if anyone "romaticizes" the single mother with 4 kids in West Baltimore or the opiod addict in Bangor, Maine, or the illiterate kid in East LA

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Reply #14 posted 09/26/18 12:37pm

jjhunsecker

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jjhunsecker said:

That may be for artists, that people "romanticize" their struggle to create and be true to their art at all costs. I don't know if anyone "romaticizes" the single mother with 4 kids in West Baltimore or the opiod addict in Bangor, Maine, or the illiterate kid in East LA

But I don't see any of those songs (by Gaye or Hathaway) as "romantisizing" poverty . They are more protest songs or laments about conditions that people are forced into, and forced to endure. They are giving a realistic view of life lived on the margins of society. Listen to a brilliant song like "Across 110th Street" by Bobby Womack, which explains the struggles of living poor, or "Cloud Nine" by the Temptations, which explains why a person might turn to drugs as an escape from their horrible reality.



Beat generation and so-called Hippies were generally middle and even upper class White people who CHOSE a life of poverty, as a conscious act of rebellion. They always had an exit from it, as they were merely "tourists". They could easily return to their comfortable and prosperous lives if they wanted to. That's not the same as people who were born into, or stumbled into poverty.

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Reply #15 posted 09/26/18 12:39pm

onlyforaminute

Is this about these $500+ designer duct-tape sneakers on sale everywhere?

https%3A%2F%2Fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fuploads%2Fcard%2Fimage%2F193909%2FScreen_Shot_2016-08-29_at_3.35.18_PM.png
And people are really buying these things.

[Edited 9/26/18 12:40pm]

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #16 posted 09/26/18 1:41pm

poppys

jjhunsecker said:

But I don't see any of those songs (by Gaye or Hathaway) as "romantisizing" poverty . They are more protest songs or laments about conditions that people are forced into, and forced to endure. They are giving a realistic view of life lived on the margins of society. Listen to a brilliant song like "Across 110th Street" by Bobby Womack, which explains the struggles of living poor, or "Cloud Nine" by the Temptations, which explains why a person might turn to drugs as an escape from their horrible reality.



Beat generation and so-called Hippies were generally middle and even upper class White people who CHOSE a life of poverty, as a conscious act of rebellion. They always had an exit from it, as they were merely "tourists". They could easily return to their comfortable and prosperous lives if they wanted to. That's not the same as people who were born into, or stumbled into poverty.


I love the movie Across 110th St too. They still show it on Bounce sometimes. Was that based on a novel like Chester Himes Cotton Comes to Harlem?


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Reply #17 posted 09/26/18 1:53pm

jjhunsecker

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jjhunsecker said:





But I don't see any of those songs (by Gaye or Hathaway) as "romantisizing" poverty . They are more protest songs or laments about conditions that people are forced into, and forced to endure. They are giving a realistic view of life lived on the margins of society. Listen to a brilliant song like "Across 110th Street" by Bobby Womack, which explains the struggles of living poor, or "Cloud Nine" by the Temptations, which explains why a person might turn to drugs as an escape from their horrible reality.






Beat generation and so-called Hippies were generally middle and even upper class White people who CHOSE a life of poverty, as a conscious act of rebellion. They always had an exit from it, as they were merely "tourists". They could easily return to their comfortable and prosperous lives if they wanted to. That's not the same as people who were born into, or stumbled into poverty.




[/quote]

Almost every member of the Manson family (except for Manson himself, who was a career criminal) , were runaways or dropouts from middle and upper class society. Read "Helter Skelter".

Kerouac was an articulate and well read White man. He chose a nomadic and poverty filled lifestyle. In other words, he had OPTIONS...

I don't think an artist expressing themselves on a subject is "romanticizing" it always... especially not the examples you provided, like Marvin Gaye and Donnie Hathaway.
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Reply #18 posted 09/26/18 1:57pm

jjhunsecker

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poppys said:




But I don't see any of those songs (by Gaye or Hathaway) as "romantisizing" poverty . They are more protest songs or laments about conditions that people are forced into, and forced to endure. They are giving a realistic view of life lived on the margins of society. Listen to a brilliant song like "Across 110th Street" by Bobby Womack, which explains the struggles of living poor, or "Cloud Nine" by the Temptations, which explains why a person might turn to drugs as an escape from their horrible reality.






Beat generation and so-called Hippies were generally middle and even upper class White people who CHOSE a life of poverty, as a conscious act of rebellion. They always had an exit from it, as they were merely "tourists". They could easily return to their comfortable and prosperous lives if they wanted to. That's not the same as people who were born into, or stumbled into poverty.





I love the movie Across 110th St too. They still show it on Bounce sometimes. Was that based on a novel like Chester Himes Cotton Comes to Harlem?




According to IMDB, it's based on a novel by Wally Faris.
A really good film. And to date myself here, I saw it when it opened in 1972 !
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Reply #19 posted 09/26/18 2:08pm

poppys

jjhunsecker said:

poppys said:


I love the movie Across 110th St too. They still show it on Bounce sometimes. Was that based on a novel like Chester Himes Cotton Comes to Harlem?



According to IMDB, it's based on a novel by Wally Faris. A really good film. And to date myself here, I saw it when it opened in 1972 !

Thank you. Wow. You'll never be as old as I am tho. I knew it was from a book. Kept searching the title + book but no author, only the movie came up over & over. I remember my boyfriend had it and I borrowed it to read. That Bobby Womack song is just stellar too.


img_20150226-200234.gif



[Edited 9/26/18 14:17pm]

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Reply #20 posted 09/26/18 2:56pm

Graciegirl719

Just saying this, I hate Karl L. He has said some really rude, sexist things about women.

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Reply #21 posted 09/26/18 3:56pm

jjhunsecker

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jjhunsecker said:

Almost every member of the Manson family (except for Manson himself, who was a career criminal) , were runaways or dropouts from middle and upper class society. Read "Helter Skelter". Kerouac was an articulate and well read White man. He chose a nomadic and poverty filled lifestyle. In other words, he had OPTIONS... I don't think an artist expressing themselves on a subject is "romanticizing" it always... especially not the examples you provided, like Marvin Gaye and Donnie Hathaway.

This is actually proving my point, and you don't even realize it. The only people "romaticizing" poverty are those - like struggling artists, and these so-called "Bohos"- who have chosen that life. Nobody finds the life that people are born into, or have fallen into, and would love to escape- people living in West Baltimore or East LA or East New York, or the middle of Appalachia, people surrounded by drugs and crimes and violence and ignorance- very "romantic". Those people are dying to escape the world that they are in.

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Reply #22 posted 09/26/18 4:14pm

jjhunsecker

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jjhunsecker said:

Almost every member of the Manson family (except for Manson himself, who was a career criminal) , were runaways or dropouts from middle and upper class society. Read "Helter Skelter". Kerouac was an articulate and well read White man. He chose a nomadic and poverty filled lifestyle. In other words, he had OPTIONS... I don't think an artist expressing themselves on a subject is "romanticizing" it always... especially not the examples you provided, like Marvin Gaye and Donnie Hathaway.

Have you actually listened to "What's Going On" or "Save the Children" or "Inner City Blues" by Marvin Gaye, or "The Ghetto" by Donny Hathaway, or "The Ghetto" (a different song) by the Staple Singers, or "Living for the City" by Stevie Wonder, or "Across 110th Street" by Bobby Womack, or "Say it Loud" by James Brown, or "Wake Up Everybody" by Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, or "Cloud Nine" by the Temptations , among numerous others ? I would be very hard pressed to say that any of these songs "describe in an idealized or unrealistic fashion" or "make something seem better or more appealing than it really is" in how they describe poverty and inner city life. These songs are all very realistic and unstinting about their subjects.

No matter what you say about Kerouac, if he had cleaned himself up, he'd have a hell of a lot more options than someone in Bed-Stuy or Spanish Harlem. That was his choice to lead a "boho" lifestyle.

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Reply #23 posted 09/26/18 4:21pm

jjhunsecker

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Did this person actually SEE "Blue Jasmine" ? Because in the film (which is a riff on "A Streetcar Named Desire" crossed with Bernie Madoff) , Cate Blanchett's character is traumatized by her loss of status and wealth, and ends up insane. She doesn't perceive it as a "more enjoyable life", but like Blanche in "Streetcar", Jasmine despairs on what fate has led her to.

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Reply #24 posted 09/26/18 4:25pm

jjhunsecker

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jjhunsecker said:

Have you actually listened to "What's Going On" or "Save the Children" or "Inner City Blues" by Marvin Gaye, or "The Ghetto" by Donny Hathaway, or "The Ghetto" (a different song) by the Staple Singers, or "Living for the City" by Stevie Wonder, or "Across 110th Street" by Bobby Womack, or "Say it Loud" by James Brown, or "Wake Up Everybody" by Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, or "Cloud Nine" by the Temptations , among numerous others ? I would be very hard pressed to say that any of these songs "describe in an idealized or unrealistic fashion" or "make something seem better or more appealing than it really is" in how they describe poverty and inner city life. These songs are all very realistic and unstinting about their subjects.

No matter what you say about Kerouac, if he had cleaned himself up, he'd have a hell of a lot more options than someone in Bed-Stuy or Spanish Harlem. That was his choice to lead a "boho" lifestyle.

I'm responding directly to you, who said that Gaye and Hathaway were "romaticizing" poverty and ghetto life. I'm simply saying that it's hard for me to understand how someone could interpret these songs that way. But I guess anything is possible...

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Reply #25 posted 09/26/18 4:33pm

jjhunsecker

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jjhunsecker said:

This is actually proving my point, and you don't even realize it. The only people "romaticizing" poverty are those - like struggling artists, and these so-called "Bohos"- who have chosen that life. Nobody finds the life that people are born into, or have fallen into, and would love to escape- people living in West Baltimore or East LA or East New York, or the middle of Appalachia, people surrounded by drugs and crimes and violence and ignorance- very "romantic". Those people are dying to escape the world that they are in.

My point, which you seem to want to gloss over or ignore, is that the only people who "glamorize" or "romaticize" poverty are those who have options not to be in it. Somebody who lives in East New York or Newark or Portland may try to see whatever they can find good about the environment they are stuck in, but they would get away from much of that world as fast as possible if they could .

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Reply #26 posted 09/26/18 5:47pm

jjhunsecker

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jjhunsecker said:




But the examples you gave of "romanicizing" or "glamorizing" poverty or ghetto life, most people would not agree with that interpretation. But if YOU see it, you're entitled to your opinion.

I don't agree that just dealing with a specific subject or situation- whether in a song or a play or a movie or a painting or a book- automatically "glamorizes" or "romanticized" that subject. Every work of art has to be examined on it's own merits, and interpreted to determine it's perspective or viewpoints.
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Reply #27 posted 09/26/18 6:52pm

SuperFurryAnim
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I wonder how many people grew up in poverty? I don't mean the being poor and taking from government poor but the I'm too proud to ask for help poor? I was poor but at the time didn't know it. The house I lived in was not heated always, we just heated a couple rooms and my parents were too proud to ever take help from the government as parents believed taking from the USA government would break it. We grew all our own food and I didn't eat meat until late teens. My mom made most of my clothes and I remember I got picked on some for that. I made a lot of money and now have a home that is beautiful with everything I ever wanted. I have to be careful around family when speaking about material things as it is a sore spot and if I spend they think I will blow through all my money. It is one to come from poverty and gain wealth. It is another issue where you don't want your family to feel guilty that the home was not always heated. The truth is you can have a million dollars saved and it doesn't change the way you feel or shouldn't. I never realized I was poor and always thought I was rich but sometimes realized in a bad situation. I remember I would be in my room and it was cold and I ate crackers, water and sometimes candy and I could see my breath when breathing from it being cold. I'm not sure if I like material stuff just simplicity clean place to live.

Trump turns from 'humbling' grief to midterm fire and furry
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Reply #28 posted 09/26/18 6:59pm

SuperFurryAnim
al

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jjhunsecker said:

But the examples you gave of "romanicizing" or "glamorizing" poverty or ghetto life, most people would not agree with that interpretation. But if YOU see it, you're entitled to your opinion. I don't agree that just dealing with a specific subject or situation- whether in a song or a play or a movie or a painting or a book- automatically "glamorizes" or "romanticized" that subject. Every work of art has to be examined on it's own merits, and interpreted to determine it's perspective or viewpoints.

I hate it when people think they are cool because they are poor and glamorize poverty. It is ok to be poor but I think there is a line where some people are making out that being stupid is cool. Some people believe in this odd belief that by having nothing you have less fear or worry. If they have a couple million in the stock market it is a burden as it can go down but by that same belief if they have nothing they have no worry. Some people have made this poor and dumb life cool where they glamorize drinking and smoking. Something I'm dead against. I want to be in control of my life the most control I have not to be poor and in a bad situation where I have to answer to others.

Trump turns from 'humbling' grief to midterm fire and furry
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Reply #29 posted 09/26/18 7:12pm

SuperFurryAnim
al

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onlyforaminute said:

Is this about these $500+ designer duct-tape sneakers on sale everywhere?

https%3A%2F%2Fblueprint-api-production.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fuploads%2Fcard%2Fimage%2F193909%2FScreen_Shot_2016-08-29_at_3.35.18_PM.png
And people are really buying these things.

[Edited 9/26/18 12:40pm]

I duct taped some shoes during my high school years. Can't believe they are selling them now for that amount of money. Makes me sad.

Trump turns from 'humbling' grief to midterm fire and furry
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