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Reply #30 posted 11/08/18 10:39am

OldFriends4Sal
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onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

I'd like to challenge more people on that bold sentence. I've heard that many times in discussions of identity. I've heard that used also when black folk justify the continued use of the N word among themselves, in music, etc'

.

I don't care who made the rules, even though a lot of alleged rules were never rules, in 2018 people can define their lives, challenge rules, change rules, overturn rules, set things straight.
That boldened sentence is a very passive take on life. Children also don't make the rules for the house, but when they become adults, their life destiny is in their hands.



Well, you can only control you. You know well enough not everybody in the AA community agrees on all the exact same things.




um I did not say 'control' or force, I said challenge people to think, that is empowering

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #31 posted 11/08/18 10:46am

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:



Well, you can only control you. You know well enough not everybody in the AA community agrees on all the exact same things.




um I did not say 'control' or force, I said challenge people to think, that is empowering



Well all black people don't go around calling each other the N-word, some do, yet that's what you brought up like it's some universal thing. Those people who argue their right to use it are protected by free speech laws, what else do you want to do about it beyond teaching the kids you know why it's not best to use it? What about everything else that's been said or I've posted, or those other people's views on how they perceive their race?

[Edited 11/8/18 10:46am]

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #32 posted 11/08/18 10:55am

onlyforaminute

What about this guy and how he perceives himself?

s-LEE-large640.jpg

Zun Lee, “Black” Photographed by Carolyn Beller

“I identify as Black. And when I say ‘Black,’ it’s not just based on race or color; it’s about what feels most comfortable in terms of a sense of home.”

How does that fit into your world?

or


this guy

s-BRETTRUSSELL-large640.jpg

Brett Russell, “Yu’i Korsou (a child of Curaçao)” Photographed by Richard Terborg


“At one point it seemed like every day, a couple of times a day, someone would ask me, ‘Where are you from?’ And when I would tell them, they’d say something like, ‘You’re from Curaçao? How can that be?’ or ‘You ain’t Black.’”


or


This woman






s-SOSENASOLOMON-large640.jpg

Sosena Solomon, “Ethiopian”

“When you say ‘Black’ in Ethiopia it just means ‘dark,’ it doesn’t say anything about your identity. It’s just a color. Just a description. But growing up here, I’ve learned how Black really is an identity.”


There's a whole frikkin world of people with varying experiences why only nit pik about a handful like their so unique?

[Edited 11/8/18 10:55am]

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #33 posted 11/08/18 11:00am

OldFriends4Sal
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onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

um I did not say 'control' or force, I said challenge people to think, that is empowering



Well all black people don't go around calling each other the N-word, some do, yet that's what you brought up like it's some universal thing. Those people who argue their right to use it are protected by free speech laws, what else do you want to do about it beyond teaching the kids you know why it's not best to use it? What about everything else that's been said or I've posted, or those other people's views on how they perceive their race?

[Edited 11/8/18 10:46am]

uh I'm obviously talking to the people who are using the N word. Not to the people who don't. I know this is a sensitive issue

.

But you also said originally: _ people did not make the rules, then replied 'you can only control you'

.

if you can only control you, then you can challenge the rules and not let others force ideas into your being.

.

And I should have clarified, that I wasn't directing that 'bolded' reply to you directly. I apologize for not making it more general. It wasn't directed at you 'personally'.

.

I'll leave this, and you can have a last word, so we don't go away from the OPs topic.

45748598_446173572574153_484060758632562688_n.jpg?_nc_cat=106&_nc_ht=scontent-lga3-1.xx&oh=242a4fea61f9affde2e0d9947b2b9eda&oe=5C7A051E

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #34 posted 11/08/18 11:02am

OldFriends4Sal
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What about them? I was looking it over, and it is a lot of the same reasonings I've dealt with before. There are varying opinions. To reply to all, or have a real discussion, the need to understand what the terms mean to each person is important. Or it will create more confusion. Like the Ethiopan woman said, black in Ethiopia is just refering to a complexion, not a racial identity.

onlyforaminute said:

What about this guy and how he perceives himself?

s-LEE-large640.jpg

Zun Lee, “Black” Photographed by Carolyn Beller

“I identify as Black. And when I say ‘Black,’ it’s not just based on race or color; it’s about what feels most comfortable in terms of a sense of home.”

How does that fit into your world?

or


this guy

s-BRETTRUSSELL-large640.jpg

Brett Russell, “Yu’i Korsou (a child of Curaçao)” Photographed by Richard Terborg


“At one point it seemed like every day, a couple of times a day, someone would ask me, ‘Where are you from?’ And when I would tell them, they’d say something like, ‘You’re from Curaçao? How can that be?’ or ‘You ain’t Black.’”


or


This woman






s-SOSENASOLOMON-large640.jpg

Sosena Solomon, “Ethiopian”

“When you say ‘Black’ in Ethiopia it just means ‘dark,’ it doesn’t say anything about your identity. It’s just a color. Just a description. But growing up here, I’ve learned how Black really is an identity.”


There's a whole frikkin world of people with varying experiences why only nit pik about a handful like their so unique?

[Edited 11/8/18 10:55am]

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #35 posted 11/08/18 11:11am

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:



Well all black people don't go around calling each other the N-word, some do, yet that's what you brought up like it's some universal thing. Those people who argue their right to use it are protected by free speech laws, what else do you want to do about it beyond teaching the kids you know why it's not best to use it? What about everything else that's been said or I've posted, or those other people's views on how they perceive their race?

[Edited 11/8/18 10:46am]

uh I'm obviously talking to the people who are using the N word. Not to the people who don't. I know this is a sensitive issue

.

But you also said originally: _ people did not make the rules, then replied 'you can only control you'

.

if you can only control you, then you can challenge the rules and not let others force ideas into your being.

.

And I should have clarified, that I wasn't directing that 'bolded' reply to you directly. I apologize for not making it more general. It wasn't directed at you 'personally'.

.

I'll leave this, and you can have a last word, so we don't go away from the OPs topic.

45748598_446173572574153_484060758632562688_n.jpg?_nc_cat=106&_nc_ht=scontent-lga3-1.xx&oh=242a4fea61f9affde2e0d9947b2b9eda&oe=5C7A051E




Welp, if this is your fight more power to you. But I'm not answering for something I don't do. There will be no point in arguing with me about. My statement wasn't referring to the N-word, my statement was referring to who is considered "black" in the United States. One drop rule, was a federal law once here.

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #36 posted 11/08/18 11:14am

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

What about them? I was looking it over, and it is a lot of the same reasonings I've dealt with before. There are varying opinions. To reply to all, or have a real discussion, the need to understand what the terms mean to each person is important. Or it will create more confusion. Like the Ethiopan woman said, black in Ethiopia is just refering to a complexion, not a racial identity.

onlyforaminute said:

What about this guy and how he perceives himself?

s-LEE-large640.jpg

Zun Lee, “Black” Photographed by Carolyn Beller

“I identify as Black. And when I say ‘Black,’ it’s not just based on race or color; it’s about what feels most comfortable in terms of a sense of home.”

How does that fit into your world?

or


this guy

s-BRETTRUSSELL-large640.jpg

Brett Russell, “Yu’i Korsou (a child of Curaçao)” Photographed by Richard Terborg


“At one point it seemed like every day, a couple of times a day, someone would ask me, ‘Where are you from?’ And when I would tell them, they’d say something like, ‘You’re from Curaçao? How can that be?’ or ‘You ain’t Black.’”


or


This woman






s-SOSENASOLOMON-large640.jpg

Sosena Solomon, “Ethiopian”

“When you say ‘Black’ in Ethiopia it just means ‘dark,’ it doesn’t say anything about your identity. It’s just a color. Just a description. But growing up here, I’ve learned how Black really is an identity.”


There's a whole frikkin world of people with varying experiences why only nit pik about a handful like their so unique?

[Edited 11/8/18 10:55am]



But this thread was created based on how one man looks and how other people perceive him. I'm just pointing out his experience isn't really all that unique. How do you feel these people should be categorized as "black"? Based on how they look or some other way?

[Edited 11/8/18 11:15am]

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #37 posted 11/08/18 11:24am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

What about them? I was looking it over, and it is a lot of the same reasonings I've dealt with before. There are varying opinions. To reply to all, or have a real discussion, the need to understand what the terms mean to each person is important. Or it will create more confusion. Like the Ethiopan woman said, black in Ethiopia is just refering to a complexion, not a racial identity.



But this thread was created based on how one man looks and how other people perceive him. I'm just pointing out his experience isn't really all that unique. How do you feel these people should be categorized as "black"? Based on how they look or some other way?

[Edited 11/8/18 11:15am]

Yeah but if he isn't even partially what he is assumed that is a lot different. The 1/2Asian guy is 1/2 Black too. He did say how people see him. He said something Alicia Keys have said a while ago about 'feeling it'. And then when she visited S Africa, she was not Black but Coloured. The Bantu people saw her as Coloured, the Coloured people saw her as Coloured and the European people saw her as Coloured.

Thanks for sharing that, it's a good piece. I shared it in a multiracial group I'm in.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #38 posted 11/08/18 11:29am

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:



But this thread was created based on how one man looks and how other people perceive him. I'm just pointing out his experience isn't really all that unique. How do you feel these people should be categorized as "black"? Based on how they look or some other way?

[Edited 11/8/18 11:15am]

Yeah but if he isn't even partially what he is assumed that is a lot different. The 1/2Asian guy is 1/2 Black too. He did say how people see him. He said something Alicia Keys have said a while ago about 'feeling it'. And then when she visited S Africa, she was not Black but Coloured. The Bantu people saw her as Coloured, the Coloured people saw her as Coloured and the European people saw her as Coloured.

Thanks for sharing that, it's a good piece. I shared it in a multiracial group I'm in.



And yet it's being presented here that he should be accepted as "black" just because he looks it. Yet, many many many people look "white" cannot do the same thing, openly, even with a "white" parent. Who gets to make that decision?

[Edited 11/8/18 11:30am]

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #39 posted 11/08/18 11:30am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

uh I'm obviously talking to the people who are using the N word. Not to the people who don't. I know this is a sensitive issue

.

But you also said originally: _ people did not make the rules, then replied 'you can only control you'

.

if you can only control you, then you can challenge the rules and not let others force ideas into your being.

.

And I should have clarified, that I wasn't directing that 'bolded' reply to you directly. I apologize for not making it more general. It wasn't directed at you 'personally'.

.

I'll leave this, and you can have a last word, so we don't go away from the OPs topic.

45748598_446173572574153_484060758632562688_n.jpg?_nc_cat=106&_nc_ht=scontent-lga3-1.xx&oh=242a4fea61f9affde2e0d9947b2b9eda&oe=5C7A051E




Welp, if this is your fight more power to you. But I'm not answering for something I don't do. There will be no point in arguing with me about. My statement wasn't referring to the N-word, my statement was referring to who is considered "black" in the United States. One drop rule, was a federal law once here.

I said I did not mean to direct that to you.

.

yes the 1 Drop Rule was a law, but it started out directed at 'white' americans to stop them from race mixing, then it took on a different energy via Jim Crow. Then in the 70s the Black Power movement took it on to use to foster numbers. But prior to that Black folk and 'Mulatto' folk new they were different, yet had a solidarity to fight against injustice. Same with the earlier civil rights movement where 'colored' people and 'women' joined in solidarity.

The one drop rule was still a racist law. And people thought to turn it into a positive thing.

That is where I brought the use of the N word by black folk, because they say it is 'reclaiming the word' or 'turning it around to mean buddy or friend or brother'

Both uses are still racist.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #40 posted 11/08/18 11:33am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Yeah but if he isn't even partially what he is assumed that is a lot different. The 1/2Asian guy is 1/2 Black too. He did say how people see him. He said something Alicia Keys have said a while ago about 'feeling it'. And then when she visited S Africa, she was not Black but Coloured. The Bantu people saw her as Coloured, the Coloured people saw her as Coloured and the European people saw her as Coloured.

Thanks for sharing that, it's a good piece. I shared it in a multiracial group I'm in.



And yet it's being presented here that he should be accepted as "black" just because he looks it. Yet, many many many people look "white" cannot do the same thing, openly, even with a "white" parent. Who gets to make that decision?

[Edited 11/8/18 11:30am]

Is it being accepted here that way? I personally was just talking about the award.

I think he should take a DNA test. And if he says he is Irish, then he is Irish.

But the award or grant should be judged by his peers who accept him working in that artist community.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #41 posted 11/08/18 11:33am

onlyforaminute

onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Yeah but if he isn't even partially what he is assumed that is a lot different. The 1/2Asian guy is 1/2 Black too. He did say how people see him. He said something Alicia Keys have said a while ago about 'feeling it'. And then when she visited S Africa, she was not Black but Coloured. The Bantu people saw her as Coloured, the Coloured people saw her as Coloured and the European people saw her as Coloured.

Thanks for sharing that, it's a good piece. I shared it in a multiracial group I'm in.



And yet it's being presented here that he should be accepted as "black" just because he looks it. Yet, many many many people look "white" cannot do the same thing, openly, even with a "white" parent, they can be "other" but not "white". Who gets to make that decision?

[Edited 11/8/18 11:30am]



I needed to add one thing.

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #42 posted 11/08/18 11:35am

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:



And yet it's being presented here that he should be accepted as "black" just because he looks it. Yet, many many many people look "white" cannot do the same thing, openly, even with a "white" parent. Who gets to make that decision?

[Edited 11/8/18 11:30am]

Is it being accepted here that way? I personally was just talking about the award.

I think he should take a DNA test. And if he says he is Irish, then he is Irish.

But the award or grant should be judged by his peers who accept him working in that artist community.



Well, truth is he isn't trying to claim black beyond getting a grant, which seems to be okay in UK law so whoopie for him he got the money to do what he wants to do.

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #43 posted 11/08/18 11:38am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Is it being accepted here that way? I personally was just talking about the award.

I think he should take a DNA test. And if he says he is Irish, then he is Irish.

But the award or grant should be judged by his peers who accept him working in that artist community.



Well, truth is he isn't trying to claim black beyond getting a grant, which seems to be okay in UK law so whoopie for him he got the money to do what he wants to do.

right, and he wasn't claiming it to get the grant either.

If he is accepted by that community and works to build it, then most likely he'll use the portion and give back. Not to mention he is married to an African woman.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #44 posted 11/08/18 11:41am

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:




Welp, if this is your fight more power to you. But I'm not answering for something I don't do. There will be no point in arguing with me about. My statement wasn't referring to the N-word, my statement was referring to who is considered "black" in the United States. One drop rule, was a federal law once here.

I said I did not mean to direct that to you.

.

yes the 1 Drop Rule was a law, but it started out directed at 'white' americans to stop them from race mixing, then it took on a different energy via Jim Crow. Then in the 70s the Black Power movement took it on to use to foster numbers. But prior to that Black folk and 'Mulatto' folk new they were different, yet had a solidarity to fight against injustice. Same with the earlier civil rights movement where 'colored' people and 'women' joined in solidarity.

The one drop rule was still a racist law. And people thought to turn it into a positive thing.

That is where I brought the use of the N word by black folk, because they say it is 'reclaiming the word' or 'turning it around to mean buddy or friend or brother'

Both uses are still racist.




It started to keep the "white" race pure, to hell with everybody else, that's the point. And that law was active within in my lifetime, so it's going to take a few generations to change that mentality with everybody, and that's what I was referring to, black people lived with that law for many generations seems silly to expect a 180 degree shift instantly, and only from black people.

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #45 posted 11/08/18 11:50am

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:



And yet it's being presented here that he should be accepted as "black" just because he looks it. Yet, many many many people look "white" cannot do the same thing, openly, even with a "white" parent. Who gets to make that decision?

[Edited 11/8/18 11:30am]

Is it being accepted here that way? I personally was just talking about the award.

I think he should take a DNA test. And if he says he is Irish, then he is Irish.

But the award or grant should be judged by his peers who accept him working in that artist community.



How much Irish makes one Irish?

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #46 posted 11/08/18 11:54am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

I said I did not mean to direct that to you.

.

yes the 1 Drop Rule was a law, but it started out directed at 'white' americans to stop them from race mixing, then it took on a different energy via Jim Crow. Then in the 70s the Black Power movement took it on to use to foster numbers. But prior to that Black folk and 'Mulatto' folk new they were different, yet had a solidarity to fight against injustice. Same with the earlier civil rights movement where 'colored' people and 'women' joined in solidarity.

The one drop rule was still a racist law. And people thought to turn it into a positive thing.

That is where I brought the use of the N word by black folk, because they say it is 'reclaiming the word' or 'turning it around to mean buddy or friend or brother'

Both uses are still racist.




It started to keep the "white" race pure, to hell with everybody else, that's the point. And that law was active within in my lifetime, so it's going to take a few generations to change that mentality with everybody, and that's what I was referring to, black people lived with that law for many generations seems silly to expect a 180 degree shift instantly, and only from black people.

The 1 drop rule was never codified into federal law.

The continued use of the 1 drop rule by black americans furthers the racism and non scientific nature of these race labels.

.

I believe it was either Frederick Douglas or Dr Martin King jr that said: the way to break and unrealistic belief is to contradict it in practice

.

.

aka: Act 320 of 1911
aka: House Bill 79 of 1911

In 1911, Arkansas passed Act 320 (House Bill 79), also known as the “one-drop rule.” This law had two goals: it made interracial “cohabitation” a felony, and it defined as “Negro” anyone “who has...any negro blood whatever,” thus relegating to second-class citizenship anyone accused of having any African ancestry. Although the law had features unique to Arkansas, it largely reflected nationwide trends.

Laws against interracial sex were not new. Virginia declared extramarital sex a crime during Oliver Cromwell’s era and increased the penalty for sex across the color line in 1662. In 1691, Virginia criminalized matrimony when celebrated by an interracial couple. Maryland did so the following year, and others followed. By 1776, twelve of the thirteen colonies that declared independence forbade intermarriage.

Though the intermarriage ban widened, extramarital interracial sex—at least between white men and black women—was tolerated. By 1910, twenty-nine of the forty-six states, including Arkansas, prosecuted intermarriage but not such instances of interracial sex. Public rhetoric justified such laws as preserving “racial purity.” Nevertheless, tolerance of white male/black female liaisons versus punishment of black male/white female relationships showed this to be a rationalization. Scholars suggest that marriage was punished because it implied social equality—an alliance between families that was not tolerated across the color line. Mere sex lacked such implication.

Until Reconstruction, states found ways to accommodate interracial families. However, tolerance faded during the Jim Crow era. House Bill 79 outlawed interracial families altogether, declaring the mere existence of a biracial child evidence of parental crime.

http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=5365

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #47 posted 11/08/18 11:58am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Is it being accepted here that way? I personally was just talking about the award.

I think he should take a DNA test. And if he says he is Irish, then he is Irish.

But the award or grant should be judged by his peers who accept him working in that artist community.



How much Irish makes one Irish?

And that is the question...

.

I remember watching Geneology Roadshow and an Irish-American man married to an African-American woman, and he just knew he had some African blood in him. His results came back 100% Irish lol

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #48 posted 11/08/18 12:17pm

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:




It started to keep the "white" race pure, to hell with everybody else, that's the point. And that law was active within in my lifetime, so it's going to take a few generations to change that mentality with everybody, and that's what I was referring to, black people lived with that law for many generations seems silly to expect a 180 degree shift instantly, and only from black people.

The 1 drop rule was never codified into federal law.

The continued use of the 1 drop rule by black americans furthers the racism and non scientific nature of these race labels.

.

I believe it was either Frederick Douglas or Dr Martin King jr that said: the way to break and unrealistic belief is to contradict it in practice

.

.

aka: Act 320 of 1911
aka: House Bill 79 of 1911

In 1911, Arkansas passed Act 320 (House Bill 79), also known as the “one-drop rule.” This law had two goals: it made interracial “cohabitation” a felony, and it defined as “Negro” anyone “who has...any negro blood whatever,” thus relegating to second-class citizenship anyone accused of having any African ancestry. Although the law had features unique to Arkansas, it largely reflected nationwide trends.

Laws against interracial sex were not new. Virginia declared extramarital sex a crime during Oliver Cromwell’s era and increased the penalty for sex across the color line in 1662. In 1691, Virginia criminalized matrimony when celebrated by an interracial couple. Maryland did so the following year, and others followed. By 1776, twelve of the thirteen colonies that declared independence forbade intermarriage.

Though the intermarriage ban widened, extramarital interracial sex—at least between white men and black women—was tolerated. By 1910, twenty-nine of the forty-six states, including Arkansas, prosecuted intermarriage but not such instances of interracial sex. Public rhetoric justified such laws as preserving “racial purity.” Nevertheless, tolerance of white male/black female liaisons versus punishment of black male/white female relationships showed this to be a rationalization. Scholars suggest that marriage was punished because it implied social equality—an alliance between families that was not tolerated across the color line. Mere sex lacked such implication.

Until Reconstruction, states found ways to accommodate interracial families. However, tolerance faded during the Jim Crow era. House Bill 79 outlawed interracial families altogether, declaring the mere existence of a biracial child evidence of parental crime.

http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=5365



Well that's one state, 49 or 48 or 47 to go. I horrific and keeping track on when states became part of the Union. I think Hawaii and Alaska were well into the 20th century so a lot of these laws may not affect them.

I do note that, though I'm sure it happened you don't hear anything about the legal difficulties a black person and a non-white person living life together in those times. Folks were hooking up all kinds of ways.

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #49 posted 11/08/18 12:28pm

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:



How much Irish makes one Irish?

And that is the question...

.

I remember watching Geneology Roadshow and an Irish-American man married to an African-American woman, and he just knew he had some African blood in him. His results came back 100% Irish lol



Hun, when this DNA testing was brand new, I was watching this special testing "black" British people, mostly to see the percentage who had "white" DNA, supposedly they expected the number to a really low single digit number, something about them not behaving as the US slave owners or something, turned out they did, but there were these chocolate brown-skinned UK folks shocked they had African DNA, made me laugh.

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #50 posted 11/08/18 12:40pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

The 1 drop rule was never codified into federal law.

The continued use of the 1 drop rule by black americans furthers the racism and non scientific nature of these race labels.

.

I believe it was either Frederick Douglas or Dr Martin King jr that said: the way to break and unrealistic belief is to contradict it in practice

.

.

aka: Act 320 of 1911
aka: House Bill 79 of 1911

In 1911, Arkansas passed Act 320 (House Bill 79), also known as the “one-drop rule.” This law had two goals: it made interracial “cohabitation” a felony, and it defined as “Negro” anyone “who has...any negro blood whatever,” thus relegating to second-class citizenship anyone accused of having any African ancestry. Although the law had features unique to Arkansas, it largely reflected nationwide trends.

Laws against interracial sex were not new. Virginia declared extramarital sex a crime during Oliver Cromwell’s era and increased the penalty for sex across the color line in 1662. In 1691, Virginia criminalized matrimony when celebrated by an interracial couple. Maryland did so the following year, and others followed. By 1776, twelve of the thirteen colonies that declared independence forbade intermarriage.

Though the intermarriage ban widened, extramarital interracial sex—at least between white men and black women—was tolerated. By 1910, twenty-nine of the forty-six states, including Arkansas, prosecuted intermarriage but not such instances of interracial sex. Public rhetoric justified such laws as preserving “racial purity.” Nevertheless, tolerance of white male/black female liaisons versus punishment of black male/white female relationships showed this to be a rationalization. Scholars suggest that marriage was punished because it implied social equality—an alliance between families that was not tolerated across the color line. Mere sex lacked such implication.

Until Reconstruction, states found ways to accommodate interracial families. However, tolerance faded during the Jim Crow era. House Bill 79 outlawed interracial families altogether, declaring the mere existence of a biracial child evidence of parental crime.

http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=5365



Well that's one state, 49 or 48 or 47 to go. I horrific and keeping track on when states became part of the Union. I think Hawaii and Alaska were well into the 20th century so a lot of these laws may not affect them.

I do note that, though I'm sure it happened you don't hear anything about the legal difficulties a black person and a non-white person living life together in those times. Folks were hooking up all kinds of ways.

all states did not inact a law, and it was never on a federal level

.

Yes, something about when people makes laws against what is natural.

.

This also goes against the concept when a generationally mixed person is asked and they use the rational or it is used in conversation about skin tones, that 'Master raped the slaves'. That happened but that isn't always why people have mixed blood. There was a whole lot of messin about going on

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #51 posted 11/08/18 1:17pm

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

onlyforaminute said:



Well that's one state, 49 or 48 or 47 to go. I horrific and keeping track on when states became part of the Union. I think Hawaii and Alaska were well into the 20th century so a lot of these laws may not affect them.

I do note that, though I'm sure it happened you don't hear anything about the legal difficulties a black person and a non-white person living life together in those times. Folks were hooking up all kinds of ways.

all states did not inact a law, and it was never on a federal level

.

Yes, something about when people makes laws against what is natural.

.

This also goes against the concept when a generationally mixed person is asked and they use the rational or it is used in conversation about skin tones, that 'Master raped the slaves'. That happened but that isn't always why people have mixed blood. There was a whole lot of messin about going on



And that changes my statement that the idea didn't originate with black people how?



https://news.harvard.edu/...-persists/

I honestly didn't know that the law even still existed into the 1980s but in this article it states there was a legal ruling on it. Yet, it keeps being put on black peoples shoulders to change the idea. I'd still like to know why? I'm well aware there's no answers here but it still is a question.


In the United States, the “one-drop rule” — also known as hypodescent — dates to a 1662 Virginia law on the treatment of mixed-race individuals. The legal notion of hypodescent has been upheld as recently as 1985, when a Louisiana court ruled that a woman with a black great-great-great-great-grandmother could not identify herself as “white” on her passport.

“One of the remarkable things about our research on hypodescent is what it tells us about the hierarchical nature of race relations in the United States,” says co-author James Sidanius, professor of psychology and of African and African-American studies at Harvard. “Hypodescent against blacks remains a relatively powerful force within American society.”




120710_arnoldho_230-11.jpg?resize=605%2C403&ssl=1

Biracials viewed as members of their lower-status parent group









[Edited 11/8/18 13:22pm]

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #52 posted 11/08/18 4:47pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

39821914_1815137568539429_8318741251599892480_n.jpg?_nc_cat=109&_nc_eui2=AeGs6QjNx250PSsyrzm5l9AkJL7heyf5kAlNY2ZQBYzO7yJKKw0OYNud7N_BoG-9T9F6t2m25t3svLQkNg6nAhRura9t97Tu0CP3SGkiVircug&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=99d413d26550a6e908a786c3368b57d0&oe=5C704A2A

Of course it did not originate with black or mixed people. BUT that it is a racist idea, why do Black people choose to take it on. It is a racist idea...

Lets look at all the racist ideals: negroes don't have souls. Do black people believe that and take it on into black identity?

how about negroes are lower than beasts, and having sex(miscongenation) is worst than bestiality? do black americans take that into their identity? do those who are not keen on interracial relationships, push that to the non black person?

and so many others

outside of the racist tools of the 1 drop rule and the N word, do black folk take into their identity any other racist concepts?

.

It's on black folk and mixed folk to change because because it is a racist concept, that enforces white supremacy. Because we have the power to change how people see us. I don't let anyone else call me out of my name, I don't let people clown me and put me in a place of being a joke or a punk. I change that. My mom took too long to stop calling us 'boy' I turned the heat up and put an end to to, Mom doesn't refer to me/us as 'boy' anymore.

34791555_1700752569977930_6774445890141683712_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&_nc_eui2=AeGWVPJcfFsZbIYdZidGrps6xxXL_K5cZZiGWHEH34VLg-XP1N3fAvfnfaP16452Yo19aWIgw5amlMjRZ4q0hH6rHqvdD7g2VMuFBt06TZpfDg&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=84f52ba00564c72194b647331e5ad191&oe=5C7027AA

.

Racial opinions about mixed identity are changing in America. The 1 drop rule is a joke and people black mixed and white are addressing it.

The continued claiming of mixed folk and biracial people is partially a politica numbers move and partially a continued adoration of European features...

.

As Tyrese proclaimed he found his African/Black queen who was not only multiracial but she looked like eveything but a mixed woman.

.

Not to mention the continued disregard of real African Americans, and their unique coloring hair texture facial features and looks. Think the movie Black Panther... if they had a bunch of 1/2 European and partial European running around in Wakanda... Angela was too much as it is.

.

When I was a young boy, having discovered Langston Hughes, in the 70s for my recital poem I recited Mulatto in front of a crowd of black white latino and asians to applause.

.

Or Halle Berry as STORM.

.

The first 'black' __ is... usually a mulatto(using the historic term here)

colorism?

41299929_1836057519780767_136701941378973696_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_eui2=AeHveJD04PpKkJVAJKd-n8FguQxZ5YqB_veUZ3hyxYxLLcgOsXVkv3s4zNFZ5w87g2L1MaoMWwVmWc8OEzGa3MfWu-ZI5pImL-X_2dEX7sktmQ&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=bc895e93dd53588298853871b4327a4c&oe=5C6B409E

onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:



And that changes my statement that the idea didn't originate with black people how?



https://news.harvard.edu/...-persists/

I honestly didn't know that the law even still existed into the 1980s but in this article it states there was a legal ruling on it. Yet, it keeps being put on black peoples shoulders to change the idea. I'd still like to know why? I'm well aware there's no answers here but it still is a question.


In the United States, the “one-drop rule” — also known as hypodescent — dates to a 1662 Virginia law on the treatment of mixed-race individuals. The legal notion of hypodescent has been upheld as recently as 1985, when a Louisiana court ruled that a woman with a black great-great-great-great-grandmother could not identify herself as “white” on her passport.

“One of the remarkable things about our research on hypodescent is what it tells us about the hierarchical nature of race relations in the United States,” says co-author James Sidanius, professor of psychology and of African and African-American studies at Harvard. “Hypodescent against blacks remains a relatively powerful force within American society.”




120710_arnoldho_230-11.jpg?resize=605%2C403&ssl=1

Biracials viewed as members of their lower-status parent group

[Edited 11/8/18 13:22pm]

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #53 posted 11/08/18 5:13pm

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:

39821914_1815137568539429_8318741251599892480_n.jpg?_nc_cat=109&_nc_eui2=AeGs6QjNx250PSsyrzm5l9AkJL7heyf5kAlNY2ZQBYzO7yJKKw0OYNud7N_BoG-9T9F6t2m25t3svLQkNg6nAhRura9t97Tu0CP3SGkiVircug&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=99d413d26550a6e908a786c3368b57d0&oe=5C704A2A

Of course it did not originate with black or mixed people. BUT that it is a racist idea, why do Black people choose to take it on. It is a racist idea...

Lets look at all the racist ideals: negroes don't have souls. Do black people believe that and take it on into black identity?

how about negroes are lower than beasts, and having sex(miscongenation) is worst than bestiality? do black americans take that into their identity? do those who are not keen on interracial relationships, push that to the non black person?

and so many others

outside of the racist tools of the 1 drop rule and the N word, do black folk take into their identity any other racist concepts?

.

It's on black folk and mixed folk to change because because it is a racist concept, that enforces white supremacy. Because we have the power to change how people see us. I don't let anyone else call me out of my name, I don't let people clown me and put me in a place of being a joke or a punk. I change that. My mom took too long to stop calling us 'boy' I turned the heat up and put an end to to, Mom doesn't refer to me/us as 'boy' anymore.

34791555_1700752569977930_6774445890141683712_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&_nc_eui2=AeGWVPJcfFsZbIYdZidGrps6xxXL_K5cZZiGWHEH34VLg-XP1N3fAvfnfaP16452Yo19aWIgw5amlMjRZ4q0hH6rHqvdD7g2VMuFBt06TZpfDg&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=84f52ba00564c72194b647331e5ad191&oe=5C7027AA

.

Racial opinions about mixed identity are changing in America. The 1 drop rule is a joke and people black mixed and white are addressing it.

The continued claiming of mixed folk and biracial people is partially a politica numbers move and partially a continued adoration of European features...

.

As Tyrese proclaimed he found his African/Black queen who was not only multiracial but she looked like eveything but a mixed woman.

.

Not to mention the continued disregard of real African Americans, and their unique coloring hair texture facial features and looks. Think the movie Black Panther... if they had a bunch of 1/2 European and partial European running around in Wakanda... Angela was too much as it is.

.

When I was a young boy, having discovered Langston Hughes, in the 70s for my recital poem I recited Mulatto in front of a crowd of black white latino and asians to applause.

.

Or Halle Berry as STORM.

.

The first 'black' __ is... usually a mulatto(using the historic term here)

colorism?

41299929_1836057519780767_136701941378973696_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_eui2=AeHveJD04PpKkJVAJKd-n8FguQxZ5YqB_veUZ3hyxYxLLcgOsXVkv3s4zNFZ5w87g2L1MaoMWwVmWc8OEzGa3MfWu-ZI5pImL-X_2dEX7sktmQ&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=bc895e93dd53588298853871b4327a4c&oe=5C6B409E

onlyforaminute said:



According to some sites I frequent a lot of black people do not make those claims, some do. I've already said the actually laws themselves were pretty recent, even the article I posted had a case as recent as 1985, yet you want to lump it all on black people, it's their responsibility, like there are not a ton of other issues happening taking up a lot of time like trying not to get out kids shot up. I've even stated, even over the past 200 years the terminology has changed, so its obvious a change is coming just not today, sorry.

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #54 posted 11/08/18 6:54pm

onlyforaminute

About hair but she is so frikkin cute, she makes me laugh. She's sopen and honest. I felt her pain.

6 mos. Later
"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #55 posted 11/09/18 5:53am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

39821914_1815137568539429_8318741251599892480_n.jpg?_nc_cat=109&_nc_eui2=AeGs6QjNx250PSsyrzm5l9AkJL7heyf5kAlNY2ZQBYzO7yJKKw0OYNud7N_BoG-9T9F6t2m25t3svLQkNg6nAhRura9t97Tu0CP3SGkiVircug&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=99d413d26550a6e908a786c3368b57d0&oe=5C704A2A

Of course it did not originate with black or mixed people. BUT that it is a racist idea, why do Black people choose to take it on. It is a racist idea...

Lets look at all the racist ideals: negroes don't have souls. Do black people believe that and take it on into black identity?

how about negroes are lower than beasts, and having sex(miscongenation) is worst than bestiality? do black americans take that into their identity? do those who are not keen on interracial relationships, push that to the non black person?

and so many others

outside of the racist tools of the 1 drop rule and the N word, do black folk take into their identity any other racist concepts?

.

It's on black folk and mixed folk to change because because it is a racist concept, that enforces white supremacy. Because we have the power to change how people see us. I don't let anyone else call me out of my name, I don't let people clown me and put me in a place of being a joke or a punk. I change that. My mom took too long to stop calling us 'boy' I turned the heat up and put an end to to, Mom doesn't refer to me/us as 'boy' anymore.

34791555_1700752569977930_6774445890141683712_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&_nc_eui2=AeGWVPJcfFsZbIYdZidGrps6xxXL_K5cZZiGWHEH34VLg-XP1N3fAvfnfaP16452Yo19aWIgw5amlMjRZ4q0hH6rHqvdD7g2VMuFBt06TZpfDg&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=84f52ba00564c72194b647331e5ad191&oe=5C7027AA

.

Racial opinions about mixed identity are changing in America. The 1 drop rule is a joke and people black mixed and white are addressing it.

The continued claiming of mixed folk and biracial people is partially a politica numbers move and partially a continued adoration of European features...

.

As Tyrese proclaimed he found his African/Black queen who was not only multiracial but she looked like eveything but a mixed woman.

.

Not to mention the continued disregard of real African Americans, and their unique coloring hair texture facial features and looks. Think the movie Black Panther... if they had a bunch of 1/2 European and partial European running around in Wakanda... Angela was too much as it is.

.

When I was a young boy, having discovered Langston Hughes, in the 70s for my recital poem I recited Mulatto in front of a crowd of black white latino and asians to applause.

.

Or Halle Berry as STORM.

.

The first 'black' __ is... usually a mulatto(using the historic term here)

colorism?

41299929_1836057519780767_136701941378973696_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_eui2=AeHveJD04PpKkJVAJKd-n8FguQxZ5YqB_veUZ3hyxYxLLcgOsXVkv3s4zNFZ5w87g2L1MaoMWwVmWc8OEzGa3MfWu-ZI5pImL-X_2dEX7sktmQ&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=bc895e93dd53588298853871b4327a4c&oe=5C6B409E



According to some sites I frequent a lot of black people do not make those claims, some do. I've already said the actually laws themselves were pretty recent, even the article I posted had a case as recent as 1985, yet you want to lump it all on black people, it's their responsibility, like there are not a ton of other issues happening taking up a lot of time like trying not to get out kids shot up. I've even stated, even over the past 200 years the terminology has changed, so its obvious a change is coming just not today, sorry.

Don't make what claims?

What do you mean by recent?

I mean there are tones of stuff on the book around the country, that is not enforced. There are all kinds of laws prohibiting sexual activity and a bunch of stupid stuff that just wasn't removed.

'Yet you want to lump it all on black people, it's their responsibility' Uh I said: The 1 drop rule is a joke and people black mixed and white are addressing it. It's on black folk and mixed folk to change because because it is a racist concept, that enforces white supremacy.

Yeah it is coming, the US census recognizes multiracial and 2 or more box options. Terms like Biracial, Multiracial, Hapa, and some other are more and more prominent. Oh it's changing, Today.


#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #56 posted 11/09/18 5:54am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

39821914_1815137568539429_8318741251599892480_n.jpg?_nc_cat=109&_nc_eui2=AeGs6QjNx250PSsyrzm5l9AkJL7heyf5kAlNY2ZQBYzO7yJKKw0OYNud7N_BoG-9T9F6t2m25t3svLQkNg6nAhRura9t97Tu0CP3SGkiVircug&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=99d413d26550a6e908a786c3368b57d0&oe=5C704A2A

Of course it did not originate with black or mixed people. BUT that it is a racist idea, why do Black people choose to take it on. It is a racist idea...

Lets look at all the racist ideals: negroes don't have souls. Do black people believe that and take it on into black identity?

how about negroes are lower than beasts, and having sex(miscongenation) is worst than bestiality? do black americans take that into their identity? do those who are not keen on interracial relationships, push that to the non black person?

and so many others

outside of the racist tools of the 1 drop rule and the N word, do black folk take into their identity any other racist concepts?

.

It's on black folk and mixed folk to change because because it is a racist concept, that enforces white supremacy. Because we have the power to change how people see us. I don't let anyone else call me out of my name, I don't let people clown me and put me in a place of being a joke or a punk. I change that. My mom took too long to stop calling us 'boy' I turned the heat up and put an end to to, Mom doesn't refer to me/us as 'boy' anymore.

34791555_1700752569977930_6774445890141683712_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&_nc_eui2=AeGWVPJcfFsZbIYdZidGrps6xxXL_K5cZZiGWHEH34VLg-XP1N3fAvfnfaP16452Yo19aWIgw5amlMjRZ4q0hH6rHqvdD7g2VMuFBt06TZpfDg&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=84f52ba00564c72194b647331e5ad191&oe=5C7027AA

.

Racial opinions about mixed identity are changing in America. The 1 drop rule is a joke and people black mixed and white are addressing it.

The continued claiming of mixed folk and biracial people is partially a politica numbers move and partially a continued adoration of European features...

.

As Tyrese proclaimed he found his African/Black queen who was not only multiracial but she looked like eveything but a mixed woman.

.

Not to mention the continued disregard of real African Americans, and their unique coloring hair texture facial features and looks. Think the movie Black Panther... if they had a bunch of 1/2 European and partial European running around in Wakanda... Angela was too much as it is.

.

When I was a young boy, having discovered Langston Hughes, in the 70s for my recital poem I recited Mulatto in front of a crowd of black white latino and asians to applause.

.

Or Halle Berry as STORM.

.

The first 'black' __ is... usually a mulatto(using the historic term here)

colorism?

41299929_1836057519780767_136701941378973696_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_eui2=AeHveJD04PpKkJVAJKd-n8FguQxZ5YqB_veUZ3hyxYxLLcgOsXVkv3s4zNFZ5w87g2L1MaoMWwVmWc8OEzGa3MfWu-ZI5pImL-X_2dEX7sktmQ&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=bc895e93dd53588298853871b4327a4c&oe=5C6B409E



According to some sites I frequent a lot of black people do not make those claims, some do. I've already said the actually laws themselves were pretty recent, even the article I posted had a case as recent as 1985, yet you want to lump it all on black people, it's their responsibility, like there are not a ton of other issues happening taking up a lot of time like trying not to get out kids shot up. I've even stated, even over the past 200 years the terminology has changed, so its obvious a change is coming just not today, sorry.

You never answered my question:

Of course it did not originate with black or mixed people. BUT that it is a racist idea, why do Black people choose to take it on. It is a racist idea...

Lets look at all the racist ideals: negroes don't have souls. Do black people believe that and take it on into black identity?

how about negroes are lower than beasts, and having sex(miscongenation) is worst than bestiality? do black americans take that into their identity? do those who are not keen on interracial relationships, push that to the non black person?

and so many others

outside of the racist tools of the 1 drop rule and the N word, do black folk take into their identity any other racist concepts?

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
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Reply #57 posted 11/09/18 7:07am

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:



onlyforaminute said:




OldFriends4Sale said:


39821914_1815137568539429_8318741251599892480_n.jpg?_nc_cat=109&_nc_eui2=AeGs6QjNx250PSsyrzm5l9AkJL7heyf5kAlNY2ZQBYzO7yJKKw0OYNud7N_BoG-9T9F6t2m25t3svLQkNg6nAhRura9t97Tu0CP3SGkiVircug&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=99d413d26550a6e908a786c3368b57d0&oe=5C704A2A






Of course it did not originate with black or mixed people. BUT that it is a racist idea, why do Black people choose to take it on. It is a racist idea...

Lets look at all the racist ideals: negroes don't have souls. Do black people believe that and take it on into black identity?


how about negroes are lower than beasts, and having sex(miscongenation) is worst than bestiality? do black americans take that into their identity? do those who are not keen on interracial relationships, push that to the non black person?


and so many others


outside of the racist tools of the 1 drop rule and the N word, do black folk take into their identity any other racist concepts?


.


It's on black folk and mixed folk to change because because it is a racist concept, that enforces white supremacy. Because we have the power to change how people see us. I don't let anyone else call me out of my name, I don't let people clown me and put me in a place of being a joke or a punk. I change that. My mom took too long to stop calling us 'boy' I turned the heat up and put an end to to, Mom doesn't refer to me/us as 'boy' anymore.



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.


Racial opinions about mixed identity are changing in America. The 1 drop rule is a joke and people black mixed and white are addressing it.


The continued claiming of mixed folk and biracial people is partially a politica numbers move and partially a continued adoration of European features...


.


As Tyrese proclaimed he found his African/Black queen who was not only multiracial but she looked like eveything but a mixed woman.


.


Not to mention the continued disregard of real African Americans, and their unique coloring hair texture facial features and looks. Think the movie Black Panther... if they had a bunch of 1/2 European and partial European running around in Wakanda... Angela was too much as it is.


.


When I was a young boy, having discovered Langston Hughes, in the 70s for my recital poem I recited Mulatto in front of a crowd of black white latino and asians to applause.


.


Or Halle Berry as STORM.


.


The first 'black' __ is... usually a mulatto(using the historic term here)


colorism?



41299929_1836057519780767_136701941378973696_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_eui2=AeHveJD04PpKkJVAJKd-n8FguQxZ5YqB_veUZ3hyxYxLLcgOsXVkv3s4zNFZ5w87g2L1MaoMWwVmWc8OEzGa3MfWu-ZI5pImL-X_2dEX7sktmQ&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=bc895e93dd53588298853871b4327a4c&oe=5C6B409E







According to some sites I frequent a lot of black people do not make those claims, some do. I've already said the actually laws themselves were pretty recent, even the article I posted had a case as recent as 1985, yet you want to lump it all on black people, it's their responsibility, like there are not a ton of other issues happening taking up a lot of time like trying not to get out kids shot up. I've even stated, even over the past 200 years the terminology has changed, so its obvious a change is coming just not today, sorry.





You never answered my question:




Of course it did not originate with black or mixed people. BUT that it is a racist idea, why do Black people choose to take it on. It is a racist idea...

Lets look at all the racist ideals: negroes don't have souls. Do black people believe that and take it on into black identity?


how about negroes are lower than beasts, and having sex(miscongenation) is worst than bestiality? do black americans take that into their identity? do those who are not keen on interracial relationships, push that to the non black person?


and so many others


outside of the racist tools of the 1 drop rule and the N word, do black folk take into their identity any other racist concepts?






So these people who self-identify as black even though they may look a certain way are being racist? Im not getting that.
"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #58 posted 11/09/18 7:13am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

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onlyforaminute said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

You never answered my question:

Of course it did not originate with black or mixed people. BUT that it is a racist idea, why do Black people choose to take it on. It is a racist idea...

Lets look at all the racist ideals: negroes don't have souls. Do black people believe that and take it on into black identity?

how about negroes are lower than beasts, and having sex(miscongenation) is worst than bestiality? do black americans take that into their identity? do those who are not keen on interracial relationships, push that to the non black person?

and so many others

outside of the racist tools of the 1 drop rule and the N word, do black folk take into their identity any other racist concepts?

So these people who self-identify as black even though they may look a certain way are being racist? Im not getting that.

You don't answer a question with a question. What you just typed had absolutely nothing to do with what I asked in gree.

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the m
 Reply w/quote - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #59 posted 11/09/18 8:10am

onlyforaminute

OldFriends4Sale said:



onlyforaminute said:


OldFriends4Sale said:




You never answered my question:




Of course it did not originate with black or mixed people. BUT that it is a racist idea, why do Black people choose to take it on. It is a racist idea...

Lets look at all the racist ideals: negroes don't have souls. Do black people believe that and take it on into black identity?


how about negroes are lower than beasts, and having sex(miscongenation) is worst than bestiality? do black americans take that into their identity? do those who are not keen on interracial relationships, push that to the non black person?


and so many others


outside of the racist tools of the 1 drop rule and the N word, do black folk take into their identity any other racist concepts?





So these people who self-identify as black even though they may look a certain way are being racist? Im not getting that.


You don't answer a question with a question. What you just typed had absolutely nothing to do with what I asked in gree.


Because I'm not getting into a debate you've been having with somebody slse . That's how I got accused of being somebody I'm not in these parts.
Tacking things from previous arguments to single words or phrazes that don't apply to what I simply said. So I'm sticking with the OP. How someone chooses to self identify and why they choose to do so. Seems to me you are concluding that if a biracial person chooses to identify black regardless of how they look they're being racist. That's what it sounds like you are saying to me. I don't agree with that and doesn't make sense.
"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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