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Reply #150 posted 11/10/17 8:20pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

I'm going through a timeline and Cat Glover officially joined the band

Cat was a guest of Devin Devasquez @ a dinner party sometimes in late December 1986 early 1987

I met Prince... the formal introduction was at his house in Beverly Hills. I was invited by Devin DeVasquez, a Playboy Playmate who was also on Star Search (as a spokemodel). She was dating Prince at the time. Prince's father (John L. Nelson) and DeVasquez were good friends.
She invited me to Prince's house for dinner and I met him when he walked in with a DAT (digital audio tape) or a cassette tape and it was "Housequake." He wanted Fargnoli (Prince's then manager) to come upstairs and hear it. He saw me sitting at the table wearing all purple—suspenders, high-waisted pants—and I had on that chauffeur's hat that I gave him for his birthday. (He wore it singing) "Forever in My Life" in (the concert film) "Sign o' the Times." He said "Who is that sitting at the table?" I was invited there for a friendly dinner by DeVaquez and he popped up, looking cute as ever, I might say.
After dinner we all went to a club. We took different cars and we ended up at a club called Voila in Beverly Hills, a private club, downstairs in a mall. I was sitting there with Fargnoli, DeVaquez, Prince and a couple of other people. Prince said (speaking in a low, raspy voice) "Cat, when a good song comes on will you dance with me?" I said "Sure!"

The first song came on and he didn't ask to me to dance. The second song came on; he didn't ask me to ask. On the third song, "Simply Irresistible" by Robert Palmer, he asked me to dance. I was wearing cowboy boots and a pair of Levi's jeans. He reached to hold my hands while we were dancing, but, I had leather gloves on, so, I couldn't feel anything.
He started doing dance steps and I started doing them; whatever he did, I did. I think he noticed that, so, he started doing them more and I started doing them more. I think we stayed on the dance floor for two songs. After that, the DJ played some kind of uptempo house music, which I love, being from Chicago. I remember I walked toward the DJ and there was a wall. I put my hands on the wall and started jackin' (a dance move closely associated with house music that originated in Chicago).

That's the night it all started.

.

.

The "Sign o' the Times" single cover...that was when Prince actually asked me to join his band. I had no idea what was going on.
He asked me to go by his house in Beverly Hills and pick up a dress. I flew to Minneapolis the next day and I had no idea that was the dress I was supposed to wear. But, that dress was supposed to be for Susannah Melvoin, Wendy's twin sister. It just so happened I fit the dress. I came to find out that was the dress he wanted me to wear for the cover and he didn't let me know what it was for.
Earl Jones, Jill Jones' uncle, did my hair. I put on the dress, they gave me Prince's glasses, Prince told me to play the guitar and they started shooting. That how it ended up on the cover.
By the way, that heart you see on the cover, was a thick glass mirror. It was so heavy and that's why you see my muscles. I was shaking holding that heart. I said "Prince, if you were going to make the heart black, you could just drawn a black cardboard heart and it would have been effortless."
But, he's smart and he's such a genius, he wanted it to look like him. I got it. If you're holding something heavy, I don't care if you're a baby, girl or woman, your muscles are going to show. Even my dad thought that was Prince. Prince's dad thought that was Prince. Amazing, right?

Cat%252C+Sign+o+the+times+Cover.jpg

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #151 posted 11/10/17 8:40pm

ISaidLifeIsJus
tAGame

avatar

bonatoc said:

It coulda been a single thread.
I can't detach the imagery of the movie from the album.

But maybe because I lived it from so close and so for real.
If you zoom this .gif @ 400%, you get the idea.




...or you can go to the movies.






Say, did I already write you about how I was in the front row in front of his mike?
(the org: "shut up already, damn!")


Quit

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Reply #152 posted 11/10/17 11:26pm

rap

OldFriends4Sale said:

this was the first official image/article I saw of the new band line up.
I believe it was in Rolling Stone magazine

carlson-sign_o_the_times__lightbox.jpg

PRINCE IN EUROPE: A PREVIEW OF HIS NEW SHOW

BY KURT LODER

IT'S FOUR IN THE MORNING, May 15th, at Quasimodo, a small, black-walled Berlin jazz cellar, but the beer is still flowing, and fresh hash smoke curls languidly through the hot, stuffy air. Some 300 people are packed into the place, most of them lucky holdovers from a set much earlier in the evening by the expatriate American singer Joy Ryder. Now they are crushed around the club's tiny stage, staring in popeyed wonder at the totally unexpected mystery gig currently under way.

There are three men in long, hooded robes on stage -- one playing sax, another bass, the third wringing wondrous sounds out of a Fairlight synthesizer. There is an amazing woman playing drums -- it's Sheila E. And at center stage, wearing a rhinestone-spangled black leather jacket and at least three different kinds of dangling earrings, his heroically coiffed hair gathered into a small ponytail at the back, stands a little guy with a peach-colored guitar. Yes, it's Prince.

"Wanna go home?" he asks, peering out at the crowd with a coy smile.

"Nooo!"

"Me neither," he says, then glances at the band. "I think we oughta play the blues in G." A flurry of T-Bone Walker-style guitar lines suddenly fills the room, modulating quickly into a series of unmistakable Hendrixisms. The song is Jimi's "Red House," sort of. "There's a beach house over yonder," Prince sings, in a playful approximation of the original lyrics. "That's where my sugar stays...." He shouts out another verse or two and then takes off into a wild, glass-rattling guitar solo that makes jaws drop around the room and jacks up the temperature maybe another ten degrees.

It has been a long and amazing night, and there's still no end in sight. Many hours before, Prince and his new ten-member group, fresh from warm-up gigs in Sweden (they'll reach the U.S. sometime in August) -- played the fifth show of their 1987 European tour at West Berlin's Deutschlandhalle to a riotous response. It was Prince's first appearance in the divided city, and local scribes were already clapping together reviews centered on such words as genius and fantastic and marveling at the show's tech data: the thirteen trucks required to carry the elaborate stage set, the 240,000 watts of lighting, the 110,000 watts of amplification, the fourteen wardrobe trunks, two for Prince alone. In short, the first of Prince's two sold-out concerts in Germany's hippest city was an unqualified success -- at least for the approximately 12,000 people who danced and cheered their way through it.

The Prince camp, however, was less than totally pleased. There were some minor missed cues, and the rhythms of the tour hadn't yet settled into a satisfying groove. It had also been a disconcerting day: several members of the band had spent the morning visiting East Berlin and were still weirded out by the ugly hassling they got from the Volkspolizei gorillas on the eastern side of the Checkpoint Charlie border crossing. (Backing singer Cat Glover, who had rather rashly made the trip wearing a hot-pink suit and a white navy officer's hat, had been detained at length over a visa foul-up.) There was a certain fatigue factor at work as well. Three of the musicians -- bassist Levi Seacer, saxaphonist Eric Leeds, and keyboard phenom Matt Fink -- do double duty in Madhouse, the jazz-instrumental quartet that opens each show, and might have been subconsciously husbanding their energies in anticipation of this postconcert surprise gig that Prince had laid on. So, while the first concert at the Deutschlandhalle had been extraordinarily good by any normal standard, it hadn't been great -- which is Prince's standard.

But this surprise set at Quasimodo has been wonderfully invigorating. Madhouse opened up, blowing straight, muscular jazz and feeling more at home here than in front of the rock-funk crowds drawn to Prince concerts. Then Prince popped onstage, commandeered a synth and led the group into a steaming rendition of "Strange Relationship," from the Sign o' the Times album. That evolved into an extended jam ("Just keep on top of it!" Prince shouted), followed by the Hendrix workout. Next came a red-hot version of "Bodyheat," the James Brown dance classic, followed by a delicate and beautifully sung "Just My Imagination," the old Temptations hit, with more band members crowding onstage to join in. "Housequake," another song from the Sign LP, with Sheila E. whomping out a monster beat, loosened the roof on the place, and the closer, "It's Gonna Be a Beautiful Night," with Prince briefly taking over on drums, blew the sucker completely off. The crowd was a puddle of glee, most patrons unable to believe what they'd just seen (and free of charge). Then, quicker than you could say, "Elvis has left the building," Prince was gone.

This hour-long off-the-cuff jam -- a rare up-close demonstration of Prince's sensational powers as an instrumentalist, an improviser and (lest we forget) a singer -- was apparently just the tonic the whole troupe needed. By the following night, considerably refreshed and still buzzing from the Quasimodo gig, Prince and his band were primed to kill -- and proceeded, unforgettably, to do so.

The Friday-night crowd, another sellout, was already on its feet and screaming as an ocean of smoke poured out onto the stage. From somewhere within this impenetrable fog there erupted an abstract barrage of Hendrixian guitar sirens. A purple spotlight cut through the haze, revealing Prince in a long black leather coat and a pair of gold-rimmed glasses, playing his peach-toned axe. As the electro-thump drumbeat that animates the title track of Sign o' the Times boomed through the hall, he began singing, and a back-light spot flashed on, silhouetting Cat Glover -- clad in the black bra and bikini briefs she would wear through most of the show -- gyrating wildly on an elevated platform at stage right. As the number built to a crescendo, the rest of the group came trooping down a long, winding ramp at stage left, each pummeling a drum with marching-band precision. Joining Prince, they spread out n the stage, beating out a resounding tattoo. It was an exhilarating entrance.

Then the lights went out, and the extraordinary stage set sizzled to life. An elaborate cityscape built on two levels, it echoes the cover of Sign o' the Times: a towering, impressionistic metropolis festooned with flashing neon signs -- UPTOWN, FUNK CORNER, BAR & GRILL, GIRLS, GIRLS, GIRLS. With all the lights popping on and off, the effect was that of a giant pinball machine. The band launched into the rollicking "Play in the Sunshine." On the stage level were Prince, bassist Seacer, rhythm guitarist Miko Weaver and backup vocalists Glover (whose picture on the sleeve of the "Sign" single has been widely mistaken to be Prince in drag), Greg Brooks and Wally Safford (two former Prince bodyguards). Elevated above them, and all but buried within her drum set, was Sheila E. And on the second tier, high above the stage, stood the two horn players, sax man Leeds and trumpeter Matt "Atlanta Bliss" Blistan, and keyboardists Fink and Boni Boyer.

Over the next ninety minutes, Prince and his extraordinary group ran, jumped, crawled and danced their way tirelessly through nineteen songs, ten of them from Sign o' the Times. Some numbers (the almost balladic version of "Little Red Corvette," for instance) were essentially abbreviated acknowledgments of past hits, but Prince did pull out the stops for certain oldies -- in particular a thunder-and-lightning performance of "Purple Rain" turned the house into a swaying sea of upraised arms. Equally memorable was the furious run-through of "1999" that closed the main part of the show, and the ultrafunk attack on "Kiss" that ended the first encore.

But in general it was the new material that was most powerfully presented. "Housequake" lived right up to its title and then some. The razor-riffed "Hot Thing" and the irresistibly exuberant "I Could Never Take the Place of Your Man" came across as instant and undeniable hits. On a steamier note, "If I Was Your Girlfriend" provided a perfect erotic set piece: as the song slithered to a close, Prince and the barely clad Glover, embracing before a giant, pink plastic heart, slowly went tilting back upon it into an unambiguous missionary positions as two neon signs high above the stage alternately flashed the words SEX and LOVE.

Throughout all of this, the band was spectacular. Prince has been listening to a lot of Duke Ellington and preelectric Miles Davis lately, and the show, while louder and maybe even funkier than ever, was also mightily enriched with jazz flourishes. The result, quite often, was an almost orchestral rock-jazz synthesis that was both harmonically exciting and (thanks to Sheila E. -- surely the world's hottest drummer in high-heeled pumps) relentlessly funky.

And the best came last. Prince started "The Cross" alone and shirtless, strumming the simple opening chords on his guitar as lighting effects flickered behind the darkened cityscape above him. Then the song started to build -- drums wading in, then fully cranked guitars, then the full band -- until the number attained an enormous, hall-shaking roar, with Prince soloing off into the stratosphere as a shower of mulitcolored silk flowers rained onto the stage. From there, the band jumped straight into "It's Gonna Be a Beautiful Night," which had the whole crowd chanting and stomping along with such abandon that certain far sections of the balcony seemed in danger off crashing to the main floor. Prince was out the stage door, into the limo and halfway back to his hotel before the cheering stopped.

(RS 503)

When and where was this photo taken??

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Reply #153 posted 11/11/17 11:37am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

The information is in the article. It is from she being discussed in the article.

rap said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

this was the first official image/article I saw of the new band line up.
I believe it was in Rolling Stone magazine

carlson-sign_o_the_times__lightbox.jpg

PRINCE IN EUROPE: A PREVIEW OF HIS NEW SHOW

BY KURT LODER

IT'S FOUR IN THE MORNING, May 15th, at Quasimodo, a small, black-walled Berlin jazz cellar, but the beer is still flowing, and fresh hash smoke curls languidly through the hot, stuffy air. Some 300 people are packed into the place, most of them lucky holdovers from a set much earlier in the evening by the expatriate American singer Joy Ryder. Now they are crushed around the club's tiny stage, staring in popeyed wonder at the totally unexpected mystery gig currently under way.

There are three men in long, hooded robes on stage -- one playing sax, another bass, the third wringing wondrous sounds out of a Fairlight synthesizer. There is an amazing woman playing drums -- it's Sheila E. And at center stage, wearing a rhinestone-spangled black leather jacket and at least three different kinds of dangling earrings, his heroically coiffed hair gathered into a small ponytail at the back, stands a little guy with a peach-colored guitar. Yes, it's Prince.

"Wanna go home?" he asks, peering out at the crowd with a coy smile.

"Nooo!"

"Me neither," he says, then glances at the band. "I think we oughta play the blues in G." A flurry of T-Bone Walker-style guitar lines suddenly fills the room, modulating quickly into a series of unmistakable Hendrixisms. The song is Jimi's "Red House," sort of. "There's a beach house over yonder," Prince sings, in a playful approximation of the original lyrics. "That's where my sugar stays...." He shouts out another verse or two and then takes off into a wild, glass-rattling guitar solo that makes jaws drop around the room and jacks up the temperature maybe another ten degrees.

It has been a long and amazing night, and there's still no end in sight. Many hours before, Prince and his new ten-member group, fresh from warm-up gigs in Sweden (they'll reach the U.S. sometime in August) -- played the fifth show of their 1987 European tour at West Berlin's Deutschlandhalle to a riotous response. It was Prince's first appearance in the divided city, and local scribes were already clapping together reviews centered on such words as genius and fantastic and marveling at the show's tech data: the thirteen trucks required to carry the elaborate stage set, the 240,000 watts of lighting, the 110,000 watts of amplification, the fourteen wardrobe trunks, two for Prince alone. In short, the first of Prince's two sold-out concerts in Germany's hippest city was an unqualified success -- at least for the approximately 12,000 people who danced and cheered their way through it.

The Prince camp, however, was less than totally pleased. There were some minor missed cues, and the rhythms of the tour hadn't yet settled into a satisfying groove. It had also been a disconcerting day: several members of the band had spent the morning visiting East Berlin and were still weirded out by the ugly hassling they got from the Volkspolizei gorillas on the eastern side of the Checkpoint Charlie border crossing. (Backing singer Cat Glover, who had rather rashly made the trip wearing a hot-pink suit and a white navy officer's hat, had been detained at length over a visa foul-up.) There was a certain fatigue factor at work as well. Three of the musicians -- bassist Levi Seacer, saxaphonist Eric Leeds, and keyboard phenom Matt Fink -- do double duty in Madhouse, the jazz-instrumental quartet that opens each show, and might have been subconsciously husbanding their energies in anticipation of this postconcert surprise gig that Prince had laid on. So, while the first concert at the Deutschlandhalle had been extraordinarily good by any normal standard, it hadn't been great -- which is Prince's standard.

But this surprise set at Quasimodo has been wonderfully invigorating. Madhouse opened up, blowing straight, muscular jazz and feeling more at home here than in front of the rock-funk crowds drawn to Prince concerts. Then Prince popped onstage, commandeered a synth and led the group into a steaming rendition of "Strange Relationship," from the Sign o' the Times album. That evolved into an extended jam ("Just keep on top of it!" Prince shouted), followed by the Hendrix workout. Next came a red-hot version of "Bodyheat," the James Brown dance classic, followed by a delicate and beautifully sung "Just My Imagination," the old Temptations hit, with more band members crowding onstage to join in. "Housequake," another song from the Sign LP, with Sheila E. whomping out a monster beat, loosened the roof on the place, and the closer, "It's Gonna Be a Beautiful Night," with Prince briefly taking over on drums, blew the sucker completely off. The crowd was a puddle of glee, most patrons unable to believe what they'd just seen (and free of charge). Then, quicker than you could say, "Elvis has left the building," Prince was gone.

This hour-long off-the-cuff jam -- a rare up-close demonstration of Prince's sensational powers as an instrumentalist, an improviser and (lest we forget) a singer -- was apparently just the tonic the whole troupe needed. By the following night, considerably refreshed and still buzzing from the Quasimodo gig, Prince and his band were primed to kill -- and proceeded, unforgettably, to do so.

The Friday-night crowd, another sellout, was already on its feet and screaming as an ocean of smoke poured out onto the stage. From somewhere within this impenetrable fog there erupted an abstract barrage of Hendrixian guitar sirens. A purple spotlight cut through the haze, revealing Prince in a long black leather coat and a pair of gold-rimmed glasses, playing his peach-toned axe. As the electro-thump drumbeat that animates the title track of Sign o' the Times boomed through the hall, he began singing, and a back-light spot flashed on, silhouetting Cat Glover -- clad in the black bra and bikini briefs she would wear through most of the show -- gyrating wildly on an elevated platform at stage right. As the number built to a crescendo, the rest of the group came trooping down a long, winding ramp at stage left, each pummeling a drum with marching-band precision. Joining Prince, they spread out n the stage, beating out a resounding tattoo. It was an exhilarating entrance.

Then the lights went out, and the extraordinary stage set sizzled to life. An elaborate cityscape built on two levels, it echoes the cover of Sign o' the Times: a towering, impressionistic metropolis festooned with flashing neon signs -- UPTOWN, FUNK CORNER, BAR & GRILL, GIRLS, GIRLS, GIRLS. With all the lights popping on and off, the effect was that of a giant pinball machine. The band launched into the rollicking "Play in the Sunshine." On the stage level were Prince, bassist Seacer, rhythm guitarist Miko Weaver and backup vocalists Glover (whose picture on the sleeve of the "Sign" single has been widely mistaken to be Prince in drag), Greg Brooks and Wally Safford (two former Prince bodyguards). Elevated above them, and all but buried within her drum set, was Sheila E. And on the second tier, high above the stage, stood the two horn players, sax man Leeds and trumpeter Matt "Atlanta Bliss" Blistan, and keyboardists Fink and Boni Boyer.

Over the next ninety minutes, Prince and his extraordinary group ran, jumped, crawled and danced their way tirelessly through nineteen songs, ten of them from Sign o' the Times. Some numbers (the almost balladic version of "Little Red Corvette," for instance) were essentially abbreviated acknowledgments of past hits, but Prince did pull out the stops for certain oldies -- in particular a thunder-and-lightning performance of "Purple Rain" turned the house into a swaying sea of upraised arms. Equally memorable was the furious run-through of "1999" that closed the main part of the show, and the ultrafunk attack on "Kiss" that ended the first encore.

But in general it was the new material that was most powerfully presented. "Housequake" lived right up to its title and then some. The razor-riffed "Hot Thing" and the irresistibly exuberant "I Could Never Take the Place of Your Man" came across as instant and undeniable hits. On a steamier note, "If I Was Your Girlfriend" provided a perfect erotic set piece: as the song slithered to a close, Prince and the barely clad Glover, embracing before a giant, pink plastic heart, slowly went tilting back upon it into an unambiguous missionary positions as two neon signs high above the stage alternately flashed the words SEX and LOVE.

Throughout all of this, the band was spectacular. Prince has been listening to a lot of Duke Ellington and preelectric Miles Davis lately, and the show, while louder and maybe even funkier than ever, was also mightily enriched with jazz flourishes. The result, quite often, was an almost orchestral rock-jazz synthesis that was both harmonically exciting and (thanks to Sheila E. -- surely the world's hottest drummer in high-heeled pumps) relentlessly funky.

And the best came last. Prince started "The Cross" alone and shirtless, strumming the simple opening chords on his guitar as lighting effects flickered behind the darkened cityscape above him. Then the song started to build -- drums wading in, then fully cranked guitars, then the full band -- until the number attained an enormous, hall-shaking roar, with Prince soloing off into the stratosphere as a shower of mulitcolored silk flowers rained onto the stage. From there, the band jumped straight into "It's Gonna Be a Beautiful Night," which had the whole crowd chanting and stomping along with such abandon that certain far sections of the balcony seemed in danger off crashing to the main floor. Prince was out the stage door, into the limo and halfway back to his hotel before the cheering stopped.

(RS 503)

When and where was this photo taken??

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #154 posted 11/14/17 3:40am

bonatoc

avatar

Mo' like "he was back at the studio before the cheering stopped", damn!
Or at least "at a private gig", geez.
Great article.

But we didn't know, did we? Neither did the reporter.
We got it shortly, there, after.

Thank the damn TBA.


A year after it happened I got my pristine K7 of le New Morning '87 concert.

For years, I didn't realize that and Small Club both shared versions of "Just My Imagination",
I didn't care for the tracks name: "check, check, rolling!"
Just press play, y'know.

Le New Morning 1987 is really a great audience recording.
You can feel Prince, Levi, Sheila, Dr., they're all in the room, ignore the hiss. Fantastic clean sound solos from Prince.
And the crowd is great, "Just My Imagination" is as peaceful and sexy as Small Club's is ferocious and uplifted.

Seesaw or not, the girl is laughing, and that's "Paisley Park on tour", right there.
For love is the color this place imparts.
You can only guess Prince's funny face.
"Get sexy with it! Humm-hmm-hmm...".

SKipper teaching French Girls and Boys to sing, and they all laugh.
They're all kinda naked. Just the emotional shoulder, y'know.
Doesn't get much pure than that, does it.

"Thank Uuuuu...".
Damn, Christopher.


[Edited 11/14/17 3:59am]

Goodness will guide us if love is inside us
The colors are brighter, the bond is much tighter
You know no child's a failure
Until the blue sailboat sails him away from his dreams
Don't ever lose, don't ever lose, don't ever lose your dreams
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #155 posted 11/14/17 2:11pm

214

bonatoc said:

Mo' like "he was back at the studio before the cheering stopped", damn!
Or at least "at a private gig", geez.
Great article.

But we didn't know, did we? Neither did the reporter.
We got it shortly, there, after.

Thank the damn TBA.


A year after it happened I got my pristine K7 of le New Morning '87 concert.

For years, I didn't realize that and Small Club both shared versions of "Just My Imagination",
I didn't care for the tracks name: "check, check, rolling!"
Just press play, y'know.

Le New Morning 1987 is really a great audience recording.
You can feel Prince, Levi, Sheila, Dr., they're all in the room, ignore the hiss. Fantastic clean sound solos from Prince.
And the crowd is great, "Just My Imagination" is as peaceful and sexy as Small Club's is ferocious and uplifted.

Seesaw or not, the girl is laughing, and that's "Paisley Park on tour", right there.
For love is the color this place imparts.
You can only guess Prince's funny face.
"Get sexy with it! Humm-hmm-hmm...".

SKipper teaching French Girls and Boys to sing, and they all laugh.
They're all kinda naked. Just the emotional shoulder, y'know.
Doesn't get much pure than that, does it.

"Thank Uuuuu...".
Damn, Christopher.


[Edited 11/14/17 3:59am]

I fuckin love your thoughts, thank you.

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #156 posted 11/15/17 6:44pm

1725topp

OldFriends4Sale said:

not the Dream Factory, nor the Camille or Crystal Ball

the SOTT album music singles long versions bsides (1987)outtakes the band the style the times

not the concert film...there is a link below 2 discuss the SOTT film

Prince

Camille

Susan Rogers

Coke Johnson

Dr Fink

Sheila E

Eric Leeds
Miko Weaver

Levi Seacer jr
Atlanta Bliss
Gregory Brooks
Wally Safford
Boni Boyer
Cat Glover

14192643_1091069754279551_6392836292158442839_n.jpg?oh=28256677ed02bd9e0b32fe25dc47923f&oe=5A71D9EB

Sign O the Time movie concert

http://prince.org/msg/7/447838

Prince & his Madhouse 8

http://prince.org/msg/7/448090

the Camille era[aborted] ~1987

http://prince.org/msg/7/4...?&pg=1

the Black Album era[aborted] ~1988

http://prince.org/msg/7/448846

*

We have definitely had our disagreements over the years and will probably have even more. That's the nature of Prince fans. But, I truly appreciate your era threads, especially for how they can serve to inform new fans as well as remind us, from time to time, why we fell in love with that skinny mofo with the high voice!

  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #157 posted 11/16/17 7:22am

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

1725topp said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

not the Dream Factory, nor the Camille or Crystal Ball

the SOTT album music singles long versions bsides (1987)outtakes the band the style the times

not the concert film...there is a link below 2 discuss the SOTT film

Prince

Camille

Susan Rogers

Coke Johnson

Dr Fink

Sheila E

Eric Leeds
Miko Weaver

Levi Seacer jr
Atlanta Bliss
Gregory Brooks
Wally Safford
Boni Boyer
Cat Glover

14192643_1091069754279551_6392836292158442839_n.jpg?oh=28256677ed02bd9e0b32fe25dc47923f&oe=5A71D9EB

Sign O the Time movie concert

http://prince.org/msg/7/447838

Prince & his Madhouse 8

http://prince.org/msg/7/448090

the Camille era[aborted] ~1987

http://prince.org/msg/7/4...?&pg=1

the Black Album era[aborted] ~1988

http://prince.org/msg/7/448846

*

We have definitely had our disagreements over the years and will probably have even more. That's the nature of Prince fans. But, I truly appreciate your era threads, especially for how they can serve to inform new fans as well as remind us, from time to time, why we fell in love with that skinny mofo with the high voice!

We are grown men, mature enough to fight and then put on some Ballad of Dorothy Park GO Let's Work or the Line and know it is just a disagreement lol


Thank U 1725topp, we have to keep this thing we got...it's alive!!

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #158 posted 11/16/17 5:11pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

avatar

moderator

IT

[Verse 1]
I think about IT baby all the time, all right
IT feels so good IT must be a crime, all right
I want to do IT baby every day, all right
In a bed, on the stairs, anywhere, all right
I want to do IT baby all the time, all right
Because when we do IT girl, IT's so divine, all right
I could be guilty for my honesty, all right
But I've got to tell you what you mean to me, all right (all right)
With you I swear, I'm a maniac, all right
You see IT ain't no joke, just a natural fact, all right

[Chorus]
I want to do IT baby all the time, all right
Because when we do IT girl, IT's so divine, all right
Doing IT, doing IT, doing IT, doing IT

[Verse 2]
I could be guilty for my honesty, all right
But I've got to tell you what you mean to me, all right
(yeah - I want to)

[Chorus](x3)
I want to do IT baby all the time, all right
Because when we do IT girl, IT's so divine, all right
Doing IT, doing IT, doing IT, doing IT

(You want to) think about IT, (You want to) think about IT (baby, all the time)
Think about IT all the time (fucking on your mind)
Feels so good IT must be a crime

[Outro]
Doing IT, doing IT, doing IT, doing IT
(Come on, come on)

Prince_sign-o-the-times_250.jpg

Initial tracking took place on 11 May 1986 at Sunset Sound, Hollywood, CA, USA (the day after Frustration and If I Could Get Your Attention and the same day as Boy U Bad).

The track was initially included as the fifth track on the first disc on the 3 June 1986 and 18 July 1986 configurations of Dream Factory.

It was kept for inclusion as the fifth track on the first disc as the album developed into the triple-album Crystal Ball on the 30 November 1986 configuration, which was eventually pared down and became Sign O' The Times.

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #159 posted 11/16/17 5:42pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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Image may contain: 1 person, outdoor

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #160 posted 11/16/17 6:08pm

ISaidLifeIsJus
tAGame

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OldFriends4Sale said:

Image may contain: 1 person, outdoor

Duane and Prince.

I havent seen this pic before.

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Reply #161 posted 11/16/17 9:41pm

1725topp

OldFriends4Sale said:

Image may contain: 1 person, outdoor

*

2 funky! That's one pimp-a-licious dude right there!

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Reply #162 posted 11/17/17 6:03am

nelcp777

OldFriends4Sale said:

Image may contain: 1 person, outdoor

Thanks, nice pic, Never seen this before. Thank you!!!!

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Reply #163 posted 11/17/17 7:16am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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OldFriends4Sale said:

Image may contain: 1 person, standing

Levi is wearing everything Prince has on almost

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #164 posted 11/17/17 7:51am

nelcp777

OldFriends4Sale said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Image may contain: 1 person, standing

Levi is wearing everything Prince has on almost

He is, never really paid attention. Miko's outfit, I am not too sure about.

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Reply #165 posted 11/17/17 8:23am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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nelcp777 said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Levi is wearing everything Prince has on almost

He is, never really paid attention. Miko's outfit, I am not too sure about.

that is true, on the SOTT he seems to only wear the turtleneck outfits yellow/cream, black, white, blue

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #166 posted 11/18/17 1:50pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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Dierks Studios Mobile 2 truck, June 1987 during the Sign '0 The Times tour in Rotterdam, Netherlands.
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #167 posted 11/18/17 2:00pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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OldFriends4Sale said:

the Ballad of Dorothy Parker

Dorothy was a waitress on the promenade
She worked the night shift
Dishwater blonde, tall and fine
She got a lot of tips

Well, earlier I'd been talkin' stuff

In a violent room
Fighting with lovers past
I needed someone with a quicker wit than mine
Dorothy was fast

Well, I ordered, "Yeah, let me get a fruit cocktail, I ain't to hungry"
Dorothy laughed
She said "Sounds like a real man to me"
"You're kinda cute, you want to take a bath?
(Do you want to, do you want to, bath)

Awh I said "Cool, but I'm leaving my pants on" (she say)
"'Cause I'm kind of going with someone"
She said "Sounds like a real man to me"
"Mind if I turn on the radio?"
"Oh, my favorite song" she said
And it was Joni singing "Help me I think I'm falling"

Brrring the phone rang and she said
"Whoever's calling can't be as cute as you"
Right then I knew I was through

Dorothy Parker was cool)

My pants where wet, they came off
But she didn't see the movie
'Cause she hadn't read the book first

Instead she pretended she was blind
An affliction brought on by a witch's curse
Dorothy made me laugh (ha ha)
I felt much better so I went back
To the violent room (tell us what you did)
Let me tell you what I did

I took another bubble bath with my pants on
All the fighting stopped
Next time I'll do it sooner
This is the ballad of Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Parker
Sweet hoo hoo ooo
Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Parker
Well
Dorothy Parker, Dorothy Parker
Well, ohh, well, aohh

Prince_sign-o-the-times_250.jpg

Do you know why he picked Sunset Sound to work out of?

Susan Rogers: I don't know. When I joined him, he'd been working there and he just loved it. It was that DeMedio console. When we planned Paisley Park, he commissioned the great Frank DeMedio to build him a copy of that console at Sunset Sound.

Paul Wolff: I built all the EQs for that console when I owned API.

Susan Rogers: Oh, you did? When Prince got the new DeMedio console for Paisley Park, Frank DeMedio came out to check the console. After he was finished, he swept it. That console had a flat [frequency response], from 0 Hz to 70 kHz. The signal path was all discrete circuits – there were no integrated circuits. It had transformers and everything, but it was just flat. What a console! You may know the song, "The Ballad of Dorothy Parker." That's the first song we did on that console. Prince was so eager to record that that he sent Frank home. He just said, "Go home, and let Susan finish it." I put up tape, and we recorded the song. I'm thinking to myself, "Oh, my god; he's going to kill me. There's something wrong with this console." It sounded all muffled, because Frank hadn't finished troubleshooting it. It's like, "I know this console is flat. What's going on? There's no high-end!" I kept thinking that any second he was going to stop, yell at me, have a big fit, go upstairs, and then I can figure out what's wrong. But he wouldn't! He just kept going, kept overdubbing and doing the vocals, and then we mixed it. He finally stopped when we mixed it, 24-hours later. He finally went to bed; I got the voltmeter and saw that one half of the power supply's rails were down. Instead of bipolar [+/-] 15 volts, we just had 15 volts. We had half the headroom, and half the frequency response. It sounded muffled, but the song is about taking a bubble bath with his pants on. It was all a dream, so he didn't care!

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #168 posted 11/18/17 2:08pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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STARFISH & COFFEE

It was seven forty-five we were all in line
To greet the teacher Miss Cathleen

First was Kevin, then came Lucy, third in line was me
All of us where ordinary compared to Cynthia Rose
She always stood at the back of the line
A smile beneath her nose
Her favorite number was twenty and every single day
If you asked her what she had for breakfast
This is what she'd say

Starfish and coffee
Maple syrup and jam
Butterscotch clouds, a tangerine
And a side order of ham
If you set your mind free, baby
Maybe you'd understand
Starfish and coffee
Maple syrup and jam

Cynthia wore the prettiest dress
With different color socks

Sometimes I wondered if the mates where in her lunchbox
Me and Lucy opened it when Cynthia wasn't around
Lucy cried, I almost died, you know what we found?

Starfish and coffee
Maple syrup and jam
Butterscotch clouds, a tangerine
And a side order of ham
If you set your mind free, honey
Maybe you'd understand
Starfish and coffee
Maple syrup and jam, oh oh

Ooh, hoo

Starfish and coffee

Cynthia had a happy face, just like the one she'd draw
On every wall in every school
But it's all right, it's for a worthy cause
Go on, Cynthia, keep singin'

Starfish and coffee
Maple syrup and jam
Butterscotch clouds, a tangerine
And a side order of ham
If you set your mind free, baby
Maybe you'd understand
Starfish and coffee
Maple syrup and jam, oh ho, oh (la-la-la-la-la-la-la)

Oh hoo (la-la-la-la-la-la-la), oh
Oh hoo (la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la)
Oh hoo (la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la)
(La-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la)

Prince_sign-o-the-times_250.jpg

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #169 posted 11/20/17 5:12am

nelcp777

OldFriends4Sale said:

susan-studio.jpg

Dierks Studios Mobile 2 truck, June 1987 during the Sign '0 The Times tour in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

So cool!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Reply #170 posted 11/28/17 11:47am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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Starfish & Coffee are one of the songs that has inspired a lot of artwork

Funny if he released it as a single back then and put Cold Coffee & Cocaine as the B side

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #171 posted 11/28/17 11:48am

OldFriends4Sal
e

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What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #172 posted 11/28/17 1:44pm

214

OldFriends4Sale said:

Starfish & Coffee are one of the songs that has inspired a lot of artwork

Funny if he released it as a single back then and put Cold Coffee & Cocaine as the B side

What is that song Cold Coffee and Cocaine?

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Reply #173 posted 12/02/17 8:25pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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214 said:

OldFriends4Sale said:

Starfish & Coffee are one of the songs that has inspired a lot of artwork

Funny if he released it as a single back then and put Cold Coffee & Cocaine as the B side

What is that song Cold Coffee and Cocaine?

Purple Rain sessions outtake (possibly 4 the Time) Prince on piano

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #174 posted 12/02/17 8:28pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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Dinner Party March 24,1987
Dinner with Prince & Miles Davis

TLM: You were part of an amazing dinner party on March 24 1987 that included Miles, Prince, Prince’s Dad, Sheila E and you. Was that the first time you met Miles?

Eric Leeds: He had come by a rehearsal for the Sign ‘O’ The Times tour that afternoon and I was introduced to him then. I had gone home after rehearsal and got a call from one of Prince’s assistants, “By the way, Prince is inviting you to have dinner with him,” so I jumped in my car and went over to Prince’s house. I kinda think that Prince wanted me there to open up the conversation with Miles and get things rolling. Miles was as much a performer during that dinner as he ever was on stage. You couldn’t get him to shut up and it was very funny! There are some aspects of that evening that I’m not sure I want anybody else to know about, and if I do, it’s going to be in my book! [note that at present, Eric has no firm plans to write a book].

But basically the most interesting aspect of the relationship between Prince and Miles was the dance that they would do around each other. What Prince really related to about Miles was his character – his legacy, his mystique and everything that Miles represented as a personality. Prince saw in Miles so much of what he thought of himself – the person that goes against the grain, that’s opinionated, that doesn’t allow himself to be controlled by any aspect of the industry for his own artistic vision. And that’s very much what Miles saw in Prince. He saw a young version of himself but there was always something about the generational thing. It was like “The King is dead, long live the King.” You had these supreme egos that had an undying respect for each other but neither wanted to give it up to each other. So with Miles, you could almost see the cartoon balloon over his head saying: “Yeah you’re young and hip, but I’ve got all of these years of experience that you haven’t had yet.” While Prince was looking at Miles and saying “Yeah, you’re the icon – but you’re old! I’m the new version!” And it defined and characterised every aspect of their relationship and it was hilarious to sit back and watch that unfold. That was the biggest enjoyment for me – watching these two dance around each other.


TLM: Any more recollections you want to share?

Eric Leeds: At one point in the evening, Miles grabbed me by the arm and said: “Eric, let me see your carriage!” I’m looking at him and trying to be cool and I say: “My what?!!” And he says, “Your carriage! Show me how you hold your horn!” And then I realised: “Oh my God, he’s using an archaic definition of the word carriage. He said “Show me how you stand when you hold your saxophone.” Then he goes: “Do you do it like this?” And he mimicked the way a saxophone player holds his horn. I looked at him and laughed and then I said, “Is that the way I should hold it?” And he said “Yes,” and I replied, “Well Miles, that’s exactly how I hold it!”

When we were sitting down the first thing I wanted to ask him was about the acid funk band with [guitarist] Pete Cosey [1973-1975], which is the band that I absolutely loved. I was one of the few people at the time that did! And Miles looked at me and said “You liked that band? Nobody liked that band! I never met anybody who liked the band. You liked that band?” I said “Miles, there were some of us who loved that band.” I also got the indication from his demeanour that that was a period of his life he didn’t remember too much about and what he did remember, he didn’t want to remember. I don’t think a lot of people realised that a lot of what Miles said, he said for effect. That he really wanted to say dumb stuff at times just to see how you would react or it was his way of making of point. So it was a case of trying to figure whether he was saying something for effect, or was heartfelt or was a direct response to a comment.

I remember asking him “Are you into someone like [trumpeter] Lester Bowie? A part of me said “Lester Bowie comes from the Art Ensemble of Chicago, a kind of music Miles was known for disliking, so what will he say?” Miles changed his tone of voice and looked at me very seriously and said: “Why wouldn’t I like Lester Bowie?” But then it would not have surprised me if I saw an interview with him in a magazine the next week where he dissed Lester Bowie! Because he was going to say what he was going to say depending on how he felt or what he felt the purpose of the question was. It was an interesting night.

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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Reply #175 posted 12/02/17 9:07pm

FlyOnTheWall

OldFriends4Sale said:

Dinner Party March 24,1987
Dinner with Prince & Miles Davis

TLM: You were part of an amazing dinner party on March 24 1987 that included Miles, Prince, Prince’s Dad, Sheila E and you. Was that the first time you met Miles?

Eric Leeds: He had come by a rehearsal for the Sign ‘O’ The Times tour that afternoon and I was introduced to him then. I had gone home after rehearsal and got a call from one of Prince’s assistants, “By the way, Prince is inviting you to have dinner with him,” so I jumped in my car and went over to Prince’s house. I kinda think that Prince wanted me there to open up the conversation with Miles and get things rolling. Miles was as much a performer during that dinner as he ever was on stage. You couldn’t get him to shut up and it was very funny! There are some aspects of that evening that I’m not sure I want anybody else to know about, and if I do, it’s going to be in my book! [note that at present, Eric has no firm plans to write a book].

But basically the most interesting aspect of the relationship between Prince and Miles was the dance that they would do around each other. What Prince really related to about Miles was his character – his legacy, his mystique and everything that Miles represented as a personality. Prince saw in Miles so much of what he thought of himself – the person that goes against the grain, that’s opinionated, that doesn’t allow himself to be controlled by any aspect of the industry for his own artistic vision. And that’s very much what Miles saw in Prince. He saw a young version of himself but there was always something about the generational thing. It was like “The King is dead, long live the King.” You had these supreme egos that had an undying respect for each other but neither wanted to give it up to each other. So with Miles, you could almost see the cartoon balloon over his head saying: “Yeah you’re young and hip, but I’ve got all of these years of experience that you haven’t had yet.” While Prince was looking at Miles and saying “Yeah, you’re the icon – but you’re old! I’m the new version!” And it defined and characterised every aspect of their relationship and it was hilarious to sit back and watch that unfold. That was the biggest enjoyment for me – watching these two dance around each other.


TLM: Any more recollections you want to share?

Eric Leeds: At one point in the evening, Miles grabbed me by the arm and said: “Eric, let me see your carriage!” I’m looking at him and trying to be cool and I say: “My what?!!” And he says, “Your carriage! Show me how you hold your horn!” And then I realised: “Oh my God, he’s using an archaic definition of the word carriage. He said “Show me how you stand when you hold your saxophone.” Then he goes: “Do you do it like this?” And he mimicked the way a saxophone player holds his horn. I looked at him and laughed and then I said, “Is that the way I should hold it?” And he said “Yes,” and I replied, “Well Miles, that’s exactly how I hold it!”

When we were sitting down the first thing I wanted to ask him was about the acid funk band with [guitarist] Pete Cosey [1973-1975], which is the band that I absolutely loved. I was one of the few people at the time that did! And Miles looked at me and said “You liked that band? Nobody liked that band! I never met anybody who liked the band. You liked that band?” I said “Miles, there were some of us who loved that band.” I also got the indication from his demeanour that that was a period of his life he didn’t remember too much about and what he did remember, he didn’t want to remember. I don’t think a lot of people realised that a lot of what Miles said, he said for effect. That he really wanted to say dumb stuff at times just to see how you would react or it was his way of making of point. So it was a case of trying to figure whether he was saying something for effect, or was heartfelt or was a direct response to a comment.

I remember asking him “Are you into someone like [trumpeter] Lester Bowie? A part of me said “Lester Bowie comes from the Art Ensemble of Chicago, a kind of music Miles was known for disliking, so what will he say?” Miles changed his tone of voice and looked at me very seriously and said: “Why wouldn’t I like Lester Bowie?” But then it would not have surprised me if I saw an interview with him in a magazine the next week where he dissed Lester Bowie! Because he was going to say what he was going to say depending on how he felt or what he felt the purpose of the question was. It was an interesting night.

Great story! Thanks for sharing. I would have loved to be a fly on the wall at that dinner.

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Reply #176 posted 12/06/17 9:18am

OldFriends4Sal
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What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #177 posted 12/07/17 2:05pm

williamb610

Awesome album!

I won my copy from a radio station, being the 9th caller to call in. It had a gold promotional stamp on the cover. Come to think of it...I think I won Graffiti Bridge the same way in 1990.

What a wonderful time back then.

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Reply #178 posted 12/07/17 7:12pm

OldFriends4Sal
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sign-tour-03.jpg n_a

What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
  - E-mail - orgNote - Report post to moderator
Reply #179 posted 12/07/17 7:16pm

OldFriends4Sal
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Slow Love

lyrics co-written by Carol Davis
Wendy Melvoin: Guitar and backing vocals on Slow Love
Lisa Coleman: Backing vocals on Slow Love

Young is the night
It feels so right
Now that U're mine
Let's take our time

The man in the moon is smiling
4 he knows what I'm dreaming of
2night is the night 4 making slow love

The gentle breeze
It blows with ease
Let's make it slow
Just like the wind blows

Let's make it last 4ever
4 a hundred times wouldn't be enough
2night is the night 4 making slow love

CHORUS:
Slow love
So much better when we take it easy
Slow love
It's so much better when we take our time

Love's in your eyes (In your eyes)
Eyes never lie
Don't rush the feelin'
U got me reelin'

U can see through race car drivers
Let me show U what I'm made of
2night is the night 4 making slow love

CHORUS {repeat 2 fade}


© 1987 Controversy Music - ASCAP

Carole Raphaelle Davis was born in London on February 17 in 1958 to a French mother and American Father. She grew up in England, Scotland, France, Italy and Thailand and moved to New York City as a teenager. Carole went to City University of N.Y. and majored in Chinese Studies and Political Science. After University she attended the two-year program at the Lee Strasberg Theater Institute. Carole modeled for Playboy Magazine, was Pet of the month in 1980 (under the name Tamara) and Pet of the Year runner-up for Penthouse Magazine in 1981. During that time, Carole sang in nightclubs and was a lingerie and bathing suit model for Playtex bras and La Perla. Carole modeled for over a hundred covers of romance novels as well as appearing and singing for commercials for Pepsi and Miller Beer.

Carole Raphaelle Davis is an actress. She has appeared in movies and television, notably, The Flamingo Kid, The Rapture, Mannequin, If Looks Could Kill and Live From Bagdhad. Her television appearances include guest star roles on Sex and the City, Angel, My Wife and Kids, Star Trek Voyager, Bob Patterson, Almost Perfect and 3rd Rock From the Sun. The full list of credits is on [IMDB.com] [1].

As a singer/song-writer and recording artist, Carole was signed to Warner Brother records in 1989. Her record “Heart of Gold” was produced by Nile Rodgers. Her single “Serious Money” was a Dance hit and the video was number one on BET. She toured Europe and Asia and performed in clubs throughout the U.S. Carole wrote the song “Slow Love” with Prince for his Grammy Award winning album “Sign O’ the Times.” She recorded her own version of the song for Warner Brothers records. She subsequently left Warners in 1993 and moved to Atlantic Records, where she self-produced and wrote the album “I’m No Angel.” As a song-writer, Carole made a publishing deal, signing with MCA. She was signed to Sony France for Europe.



What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In someone else's box?
Tell me, what's the matter with your world
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