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Reply #30 posted 11/15/18 11:15am

databank

avatar

violetcrush said:

databank said:

No, of course, I wasn't implying that.

What I meant is that another label may have given Prince 3 records and given-up on him, which is exactly what Virgin did with W&L (despite good reviews at the time).

Actually, I believe Wendy & Lisa went through a couple of labels, so they didn't even get 3 chances for a hit record. Yes, I can see your point with WB and Prince. He did get unprecedented support and control of his music from WB.

They were actually signed to Virgin for all 3 records but for the first 2 albums, Virgin only distributed them in Europe, while Columbia/CBS was in charge of North America, Oceania and Japan.

I'm not sure why: it might be that, at the time, Virgin wasn't yet established outside of Europe, I'm not sure. For the third album, Virgin handled worldwide distribution.

I'm not sure if this situation helped or harmed them, depending on how much Virgin and CBD/Columbia promoted them in their respective areas.

I think I remember W&L once said they sold better in Europe and blamed it on the "less sophisticated American audiences", however it's possible that for the first 2 records, CBS/Columbia's promotion wasn't strong enough in the US.

A COMPREHENSIVE PRINCE DISCOGRAPHY (work in progress ^^): https://sites.google.com/...iscog/home
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Reply #31 posted 11/15/18 11:34am

violetcrush

databank said:

violetcrush said:

Actually, I believe Wendy & Lisa went through a couple of labels, so they didn't even get 3 chances for a hit record. Yes, I can see your point with WB and Prince. He did get unprecedented support and control of his music from WB.

They were actually signed to Virgin for all 3 records but for the first 2 albums, Virgin only distributed them in Europe, while Columbia/CBS was in charge of North America, Oceania and Japan.

I'm not sure why: it might be that, at the time, Virgin wasn't yet established outside of Europe, I'm not sure. For the third album, Virgin handled worldwide distribution.

I'm not sure if this situation helped or harmed them, depending on how much Virgin and CBD/Columbia promoted them in their respective areas.

I think I remember W&L once said they sold better in Europe and blamed it on the "less sophisticated American audiences", however it's possible that for the first 2 records, CBS/Columbia's promotion wasn't strong enough in the US.

I have the re-issue of Eroica which has Lisa's memory of recording during that time. She states that Fruit At The Bottom was done more to try to please the record company, because the company wanted Top 40 success. She writes that they were then signed to Virgin Worldwide which gave them more freedom to write the way they wanted. She does confirm that Europe responded well to the album, but it was very difficult in the US. She said the US marketing group had no idea how to market their music. which makes sense. I was listening mainly to alternative music stations at that time (I was in college), and would have loved to hear their music on my station. Songs like Mother Of Pearl, Skeleton Key, and also Stay, and I Think It Was December from the other albums would have been well received on that station.

*

So, yes, I guess same big umbrella with different label names based on location.

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Reply #32 posted 11/15/18 2:26pm

databank

avatar

violetcrush said:



databank said:




violetcrush said:




Actually, I believe Wendy & Lisa went through a couple of labels, so they didn't even get 3 chances for a hit record. Yes, I can see your point with WB and Prince. He did get unprecedented support and control of his music from WB.



They were actually signed to Virgin for all 3 records but for the first 2 albums, Virgin only distributed them in Europe, while Columbia/CBS was in charge of North America, Oceania and Japan.


I'm not sure why: it might be that, at the time, Virgin wasn't yet established outside of Europe, I'm not sure. For the third album, Virgin handled worldwide distribution.


I'm not sure if this situation helped or harmed them, depending on how much Virgin and CBD/Columbia promoted them in their respective areas.


I think I remember W&L once said they sold better in Europe and blamed it on the "less sophisticated American audiences", however it's possible that for the first 2 records, CBS/Columbia's promotion wasn't strong enough in the US.




I have the re-issue of Eroica which has Lisa's memory of recording during that time. She states that Fruit At The Bottom was done more to try to please the record company, because the company wanted Top 40 success. She writes that they were then signed to Virgin Worldwide which gave them more freedom to write the way they wanted. She does confirm that Europe responded well to the album, but it was very difficult in the US. She said the US marketing group had no idea how to market their music. which makes sense. I was listening mainly to alternative music stations at that time (I was in college), and would have loved to hear their music on my station. Songs like Mother Of Pearl, Skeleton Key, and also Stay, and I Think It Was December from the other albums would have been well received on that station.


*


So, yes, I guess same big umbrella with different label names based on location.



What I can tell is there was ZERO promotion, airplay or music videos in France for either album. No one knew of them besides Prince fans.
A COMPREHENSIVE PRINCE DISCOGRAPHY (work in progress ^^): https://sites.google.com/...iscog/home
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Reply #33 posted 11/15/18 2:42pm

violetcrush

databank said:

violetcrush said:

I have the re-issue of Eroica which has Lisa's memory of recording during that time. She states that Fruit At The Bottom was done more to try to please the record company, because the company wanted Top 40 success. She writes that they were then signed to Virgin Worldwide which gave them more freedom to write the way they wanted. She does confirm that Europe responded well to the album, but it was very difficult in the US. She said the US marketing group had no idea how to market their music. which makes sense. I was listening mainly to alternative music stations at that time (I was in college), and would have loved to hear their music on my station. Songs like Mother Of Pearl, Skeleton Key, and also Stay, and I Think It Was December from the other albums would have been well received on that station.

*

So, yes, I guess same big umbrella with different label names based on location.

What I can tell is there was ZERO promotion, airplay or music videos in France for either album. No one knew of them besides Prince fans.

Yeah, they got very little promotion here in the US. MTV ran their videos, but only the "pop" focused singles. They did not get radio airplay. They did a lot of touring in Europe though. Great footage on YT of their Rotterdam concert in '90, the Baden Baden show in 1989, Werchter in '90 and a bunch of interviews they did over there during that time to promote the shows. They only did a few small shows over here. Really a shame, because the music is fantastic. So is White Flags Of Winter Chimneys from 2008 - have you heard that one? SO good. Their music has this amazing ethereal quality to it. Beautiful sounds.

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Reply #34 posted 11/16/18 12:10am

databank

avatar

violetcrush said:



databank said:


violetcrush said:



I have the re-issue of Eroica which has Lisa's memory of recording during that time. She states that Fruit At The Bottom was done more to try to please the record company, because the company wanted Top 40 success. She writes that they were then signed to Virgin Worldwide which gave them more freedom to write the way they wanted. She does confirm that Europe responded well to the album, but it was very difficult in the US. She said the US marketing group had no idea how to market their music. which makes sense. I was listening mainly to alternative music stations at that time (I was in college), and would have loved to hear their music on my station. Songs like Mother Of Pearl, Skeleton Key, and also Stay, and I Think It Was December from the other albums would have been well received on that station.


*


So, yes, I guess same big umbrella with different label names based on location.




What I can tell is there was ZERO promotion, airplay or music videos in France for either album. No one knew of them besides Prince fans.


Yeah, they got very little promotion here in the US. MTV ran their videos, but only the "pop" focused singles. They did not get radio airplay. They did a lot of touring in Europe though. Great footage on YT of their Rotterdam concert in '90, the Baden Baden show in 1989, Werchter in '90 and a bunch of interviews they did over there during that time to promote the shows. They only did a few small shows over here. Really a shame, because the music is fantastic. So is White Flags Of Winter Chimneys from 2008 - have you heard that one? SO good. Their music has this amazing ethereal quality to it. Beautiful sounds.


Yeah I have all their records. It's a pity Trevor Horn turned his back on them: the ZTT album could have changed everything for them.
[Edited 11/16/18 1:03am]
A COMPREHENSIVE PRINCE DISCOGRAPHY (work in progress ^^): https://sites.google.com/...iscog/home
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Reply #35 posted 11/16/18 4:51am

violetcrush

databank said:

violetcrush said:

Yeah, they got very little promotion here in the US. MTV ran their videos, but only the "pop" focused singles. They did not get radio airplay. They did a lot of touring in Europe though. Great footage on YT of their Rotterdam concert in '90, the Baden Baden show in 1989, Werchter in '90 and a bunch of interviews they did over there during that time to promote the shows. They only did a few small shows over here. Really a shame, because the music is fantastic. So is White Flags Of Winter Chimneys from 2008 - have you heard that one? SO good. Their music has this amazing ethereal quality to it. Beautiful sounds.

Yeah I have all their records. It's a pity Trevor Horn turned his back on them: the ZTT album could have changed everything for them. [Edited 11/16/18 1:03am]

That story is unbelievable to me. How can a guy who produced such progressives like Frankie Goes To Hollywood and Grace Jones end up being that close-minded?? Some switch must have turned on or off in his head by the 2000's. mad

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Reply #36 posted 11/18/18 7:58am

databank

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violetcrush said:

databank said:

violetcrush said: Yeah I have all their records. It's a pity Trevor Horn turned his back on them: the ZTT album could have changed everything for them. [Edited 11/16/18 1:03am]

That story is unbelievable to me. How can a guy who produced such progressives like Frankie Goes To Hollywood and Grace Jones end up being that close-minded?? Some switch must have turned on or off in his head by the 2000's. mad

It was circa 1994. I'm not sure what really happened because I've read different accounts of it in different W&L interviews, that I find hard to reconcile because they cite entirely different reasons each time, so IDK.

2 work-in-progress versions of the ZTT album made their way to bootlegs, though. You can have an idea of what it could have been.

A COMPREHENSIVE PRINCE DISCOGRAPHY (work in progress ^^): https://sites.google.com/...iscog/home
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Reply #37 posted 11/18/18 8:10am

violetcrush

databank said:

violetcrush said:

That story is unbelievable to me. How can a guy who produced such progressives like Frankie Goes To Hollywood and Grace Jones end up being that close-minded?? Some switch must have turned on or off in his head by the 2000's. mad

It was circa 1994. I'm not sure what really happened because I've read different accounts of it in different W&L interviews, that I find hard to reconcile because they cite entirely different reasons each time, so IDK.

2 work-in-progress versions of the ZTT album made their way to bootlegs, though. You can have an idea of what it could have been.

Below is their discussion with "Out" magazine in 2008. It think by that point they were more comfortable discussing their situation - regarding Prince and other people/projects. I imagine in earlier years they were not as forthcoming, because they were not discussing their sexuality and/or their conflicts related to it...

*

"You were dealing with this during the Reagan years when the AIDS crisis was exploding and the progressive attitude regarding gays started reversing. It mustve been hard to contend with that while the music industry pushed you to be the next Mary Jane Girls.
Wendy and Lisa, nearly in unison: Thats exactly what they wanted.
Wendy: We couldnt have been more opposite of that. We were just geeky musicians. We still are. We did a record 10, 11 years ago with Trevor Horn that was never released. We were hoping that we would have the next fucking Grace Jones Slave to the Rhythm extravaganza. We thought, This is going to be genius! Were going to be musician freaks and experiment. And he, honest to god, wanted us to be the Spice Girls. My heart was broken.
Lisa: Not only that, but he was so homophobic. I hate to say it, but he wouldnt even let us eat off of his silverware on Friday because he was Jewish. It turned into this nightmare. He and his wife, oh God, I dont want to talk disparagingly about anybody, but it made us very uncomfortable.
Wendy: Our homosexuality became quite an issue for them.

Thats especially disturbing coming from the guy who produced Frankie Goes to Hollywood and Grace Jones and the Pet Shop Boys.
Wendy: And Marc Almond and ABC and t.A.T.u. You name it.
Lisa: He would come in and start talking, Well, I asked my rabbi about homosexuality and my rabbi said its comparable to being born a mass murderer. You can be born a mass murderer, but if you practice mass murder its sinful. I was like, Okay, you can be born gay, but if you practice being gay, you might as well be a mass murderer? Oh, thanks Trev. Lets record this song now."

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Reply #38 posted 11/18/18 8:19am

databank

avatar

violetcrush said:

databank said:

It was circa 1994. I'm not sure what really happened because I've read different accounts of it in different W&L interviews, that I find hard to reconcile because they cite entirely different reasons each time, so IDK.

2 work-in-progress versions of the ZTT album made their way to bootlegs, though. You can have an idea of what it could have been.

Below is their discussion with "Out" magazine in 2008. It think by that point they were more comfortable discussing their situation - regarding Prince and other people/projects. I imagine in earlier years they were not as forthcoming, because they were not discussing their sexuality and/or their conflicts related to it...

*

"You were dealing with this during the Reagan years when the AIDS crisis was exploding and the progressive attitude regarding gays started reversing. It mustve been hard to contend with that while the music industry pushed you to be the next Mary Jane Girls.
Wendy and Lisa, nearly in unison: Thats exactly what they wanted.
Wendy: We couldnt have been more opposite of that. We were just geeky musicians. We still are. We did a record 10, 11 years ago with Trevor Horn that was never released. We were hoping that we would have the next fucking Grace Jones Slave to the Rhythm extravaganza. We thought, This is going to be genius! Were going to be musician freaks and experiment. And he, honest to god, wanted us to be the Spice Girls. My heart was broken.
Lisa: Not only that, but he was so homophobic. I hate to say it, but he wouldnt even let us eat off of his silverware on Friday because he was Jewish. It turned into this nightmare. He and his wife, oh God, I dont want to talk disparagingly about anybody, but it made us very uncomfortable.
Wendy: Our homosexuality became quite an issue for them.

Thats especially disturbing coming from the guy who produced Frankie Goes to Hollywood and Grace Jones and the Pet Shop Boys.
Wendy: And Marc Almond and ABC and t.A.T.u. You name it.
Lisa: He would come in and start talking, Well, I asked my rabbi about homosexuality and my rabbi said its comparable to being born a mass murderer. You can be born a mass murderer, but if you practice mass murder its sinful. I was like, Okay, you can be born gay, but if you practice being gay, you might as well be a mass murderer? Oh, thanks Trev. Lets record this song now."

Yeah I've read that and it's pretty shocking. Your explanation makes sense so IDK.

A COMPREHENSIVE PRINCE DISCOGRAPHY (work in progress ^^): https://sites.google.com/...iscog/home
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Reply #39 posted 11/21/18 2:46pm

Latin

pinkcashmere23 said:

cool Thanks Latin!


You are very welcome. smile
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Reply #40 posted 11/21/18 9:30pm

databank

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Part II

https://www.soulhead.com/2018/11/19/paisley-diaries-volume-1-silly-rappers-talking-silly-part-2-of-3-by-miles-marshall-lewis/

A COMPREHENSIVE PRINCE DISCOGRAPHY (work in progress ^^): https://sites.google.com/...iscog/home
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Reply #41 posted 11/26/18 10:20pm

databank

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Part III

https://www.soulhead.com/2018/11/26/paisley-diaries-volume-1-silly-rappers-talking-silly-part-3-of-3-by-miles-marshall-lewis/

.

I spotted no less than 4 (four) factual mistakes in the last part, which is a pity because the whole thing is well written.

Also, and disappointingly, zero new informations for hardcore fans. Probably quite instructive for casual fans, though.

In the end this first part was way more an essay about Prince and hip-hop than an article about TC Ellis' album or Paisley Park. I wish Levi could have been interviewed to shed some more light on the recording process, or that TC would have been asked about things he hadn't already told in his interview with Dye.

I hope we'll learn more new facts with what comes next.

A COMPREHENSIVE PRINCE DISCOGRAPHY (work in progress ^^): https://sites.google.com/...iscog/home
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Reply #42 posted 11/27/18 2:23pm

onlyforaminute

violetcrush said:

databank said:

It was circa 1994. I'm not sure what really happened because I've read different accounts of it in different W&L interviews, that I find hard to reconcile because they cite entirely different reasons each time, so IDK.

2 work-in-progress versions of the ZTT album made their way to bootlegs, though. You can have an idea of what it could have been.

Below is their discussion with "Out" magazine in 2008. It think by that point they were more comfortable discussing their situation - regarding Prince and other people/projects. I imagine in earlier years they were not as forthcoming, because they were not discussing their sexuality and/or their conflicts related to it...

*

"You were dealing with this during the Reagan years when the AIDS crisis was exploding and the progressive attitude regarding gays started reversing. It mustve been hard to contend with that while the music industry pushed you to be the next Mary Jane Girls.
Wendy and Lisa, nearly in unison: Thats exactly what they wanted.
Wendy: We couldnt have been more opposite of that. We were just geeky musicians. We still are. We did a record 10, 11 years ago with Trevor Horn that was never released. We were hoping that we would have the next fucking Grace Jones Slave to the Rhythm extravaganza. We thought, This is going to be genius! Were going to be musician freaks and experiment. And he, honest to god, wanted us to be the Spice Girls. My heart was broken.
Lisa: Not only that, but he was so homophobic. I hate to say it, but he wouldnt even let us eat off of his silverware on Friday because he was Jewish. It turned into this nightmare. He and his wife, oh God, I dont want to talk disparagingly about anybody, but it made us very uncomfortable.
Wendy: Our homosexuality became quite an issue for them.

Thats especially disturbing coming from the guy who produced Frankie Goes to Hollywood and Grace Jones and the Pet Shop Boys.
Wendy: And Marc Almond and ABC and t.A.T.u. You name it.
Lisa: He would come in and start talking, Well, I asked my rabbi about homosexuality and my rabbi said its comparable to being born a mass murderer. You can be born a mass murderer, but if you practice mass murder its sinful. I was like, Okay, you can be born gay, but if you practice being gay, you might as well be a mass murderer? Oh, thanks Trev. Lets record this song now."



Geesh, the things they've had to deal with in their career.

"You want to know your biggest fault? You don’t keep true accounts: you put a high value on what you’ve given, a low value on what you’ve received."

- Seneca, On Anger 3.31.3
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Reply #43 posted 11/28/18 1:45pm

luvsexy4all

was this posted?

https://theiconicprince.wordpress.com/2017/05/19/our-teenage-virtuoso-is-home-to-play-at-last/

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Reply #44 posted 11/28/18 1:55pm

violetcrush

onlyforaminute said:

violetcrush said:

Below is their discussion with "Out" magazine in 2008. It think by that point they were more comfortable discussing their situation - regarding Prince and other people/projects. I imagine in earlier years they were not as forthcoming, because they were not discussing their sexuality and/or their conflicts related to it...

*

"You were dealing with this during the Reagan years when the AIDS crisis was exploding and the progressive attitude regarding gays started reversing. It mustve been hard to contend with that while the music industry pushed you to be the next Mary Jane Girls.
Wendy and Lisa, nearly in unison: Thats exactly what they wanted.
Wendy: We couldnt have been more opposite of that. We were just geeky musicians. We still are. We did a record 10, 11 years ago with Trevor Horn that was never released. We were hoping that we would have the next fucking Grace Jones Slave to the Rhythm extravaganza. We thought, This is going to be genius! Were going to be musician freaks and experiment. And he, honest to god, wanted us to be the Spice Girls. My heart was broken.
Lisa: Not only that, but he was so homophobic. I hate to say it, but he wouldnt even let us eat off of his silverware on Friday because he was Jewish. It turned into this nightmare. He and his wife, oh God, I dont want to talk disparagingly about anybody, but it made us very uncomfortable.
Wendy: Our homosexuality became quite an issue for them.

Thats especially disturbing coming from the guy who produced Frankie Goes to Hollywood and Grace Jones and the Pet Shop Boys.
Wendy: And Marc Almond and ABC and t.A.T.u. You name it.
Lisa: He would come in and start talking, Well, I asked my rabbi about homosexuality and my rabbi said its comparable to being born a mass murderer. You can be born a mass murderer, but if you practice mass murder its sinful. I was like, Okay, you can be born gay, but if you practice being gay, you might as well be a mass murderer? Oh, thanks Trev. Lets record this song now."



Geesh, the things they've had to deal with in their career.

I know, right?? Really a bummer. They are so talented, and their music and scores are beautiful. Not fair sad

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Reply #45 posted 11/28/18 3:13pm

42Kristen

Interesting read/

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Reply #46 posted 11/29/18 11:09am

soulhead

Thanks everyone for your responses, insight and discussion.

Although we are not currently planning to cover each and EVERY artist released, our initial lineup (still finalizing) includes some popular and not so popular. All are worthy. Depending on how our initial volumes are received, we will most definitely explore further.

We officially launched with the intro posted but then followed up with a live discussion event, "Prince VS. Hip-Hop: A Dis...p with Rap" in Los Angeles at the Metaphor Club. It was amazing and Andre' Cymone and his amazing wife Katherine joined as well. Even Prince's own nephew was in attendance! The house was packed and Miles Marhsall Lewis on soulhead founder, Ron Worthy spoke on the subject.

The same day, we released the first of a 3 part essay called "Silly Rappers Talking Silly," which includes bits of conversations Miles had with Paisley Park rapper T.C. Ellis. The piece sticked to the facts and was a fair assessment of Ellis' True Confessions as well as his relationship with Prince among other related topics. I think you will like it.

Here are the links to all of the parts:

Intro

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

In terms of the upcoming pieces, I invite you to follow soulhead and Miles on social media.

soulhead

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Miles Marshall Lewis

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Please check it out and let us know what you think.

Ron Worthy

Founder, soulhead.com

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Reply #47 posted 11/29/18 11:11am

soulhead

Thanks everyone for your responses, insight and discussion.

Although we are not currently planning to cover each and EVERY artist released, our initial lineup (still finalizing) includes some popular and not so popular. All are worthy. Depending on how our initial volumes are received, we will most definitely explore further.

We officially launched with the intro posted but then followed up with a live discussion event, "Prince VS. Hip-Hop: A Dis...p with Rap" in Los Angeles at the Metaphor Club. It was amazing and Andre' Cymone and his amazing wife Katherine joined as well. Even Prince's own nephew was in attendance! The house was packed and Miles Marhsall Lewis on soulhead founder, Ron Worthy spoke on the subject.

The same day, we released the first of a 3 part essay called "Silly Rappers Talking Silly," which includes bits of conversations Miles had with Paisley Park rapper T.C. Ellis. The piece sticked to the facts and was a fair assessment of Ellis' True Confessions as well as his relationship with Prince among other related topics. I think you will like it.

Here are the links to all of the parts:

Intro

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

In terms of the upcoming pieces, I invite you to follow soulhead and Miles on social media.

soulhead

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Miles Marshall Lewis

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Please check it out and let us know what you think.

Ron Worthy

Founder, soulhead.com

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Reply #48 posted 11/29/18 11:28am

databank

avatar

soulhead said:

Thanks everyone for your responses, insight and discussion.

Although we are not currently planning to cover each and EVERY artist released, our initial lineup (still finalizing) includes some popular and not so popular. All are worthy. Depending on how our initial volumes are received, we will most definitely explore further.

We officially launched with the intro posted but then followed up with a live discussion event, "Prince VS. Hip-Hop: A Dis...p with Rap" in Los Angeles at the Metaphor Club. It was amazing and Andre' Cymone and his amazing wife Katherine joined as well. Even Prince's own nephew was in attendance! The house was packed and Miles Marhsall Lewis on soulhead founder, Ron Worthy spoke on the subject.

The same day, we released the first of a 3 part essay called "Silly Rappers Talking Silly," which includes bits of conversations Miles had with Paisley Park rapper T.C. Ellis. The piece sticked to the facts and was a fair assessment of Ellis' True Confessions as well as his relationship with Prince among other related topics. I think you will like it.

Here are the links to all of the parts:

Intro

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

In terms of the upcoming pieces, I invite you to follow soulhead and Miles on social media.

soulhead

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Miles Marshall Lewis

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Please check it out and let us know what you think.

Ron Worthy

Founder, soulhead.com

Thx for the good work. My critics aimed to be contructive and I look forward to reading the rest. I also realize that the readership isn't just made of hardcore fans and that many people will learn a lot from those articles. I actually realized after posting that I did learn one thing: I wasn't aware of the fact that TC had been offered Tony M's place in the NPG. Regarding factual errors there might be a fifth one regarding the album's recording dates but I'm not sure: previous research (Nilsen, Uptown and co.) could also be inaccurate. Regardless, it's nice to see the label getting some attention, it was an important part of our lives as fans. Peace hug

A COMPREHENSIVE PRINCE DISCOGRAPHY (work in progress ^^): https://sites.google.com/...iscog/home
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Reply #49 posted 11/29/18 12:37pm

violetcrush

databank said:

soulhead said:

Thanks everyone for your responses, insight and discussion.

Although we are not currently planning to cover each and EVERY artist released, our initial lineup (still finalizing) includes some popular and not so popular. All are worthy. Depending on how our initial volumes are received, we will most definitely explore further.

We officially launched with the intro posted but then followed up with a live discussion event, "Prince VS. Hip-Hop: A Dis...p with Rap" in Los Angeles at the Metaphor Club. It was amazing and Andre' Cymone and his amazing wife Katherine joined as well. Even Prince's own nephew was in attendance! The house was packed and Miles Marhsall Lewis on soulhead founder, Ron Worthy spoke on the subject.

The same day, we released the first of a 3 part essay called "Silly Rappers Talking Silly," which includes bits of conversations Miles had with Paisley Park rapper T.C. Ellis. The piece sticked to the facts and was a fair assessment of Ellis' True Confessions as well as his relationship with Prince among other related topics. I think you will like it.

Here are the links to all of the parts:

Intro

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

In terms of the upcoming pieces, I invite you to follow soulhead and Miles on social media.

soulhead

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Miles Marshall Lewis

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Please check it out and let us know what you think.

Ron Worthy

Founder, soulhead.com

Thx for the good work. My critics aimed to be contructive and I look forward to reading the rest. I also realize that the readership isn't just made of hardcore fans and that many people will learn a lot from those articles. I actually realized after posting that I did learn one thing: I wasn't aware of the fact that TC had been offered Tony M's place in the NPG. Regarding factual errors there might be a fifth one regarding the album's recording dates but I'm not sure: previous research (Nilsen, Uptown and co.) could also be inaccurate. Regardless, it's nice to see the label getting some attention, it was an important part of our lives as fans. Peace hug

I read Part 1, and it flowed nicely. I already had the history down as well, but I agree it is a nice synopsis and an easy read for those who weren't around or not following Prince in the late 80's/early 90's.

*

One other tidbit that would have been interesting to include is Wendy's account of attending a PP event (during her interview with Questlove) where she brought the Public Enemy record and had the DJ play Fight The Power. She said Prince had not heard the record or Chuck D, and he was visibly angry while listening to the song. She said he had a look of "why am I being assaulted by this music?" People immediately started dancing to the song, and he seemed to realize in that moment that he was not going to beat the rap/hiphop movement.

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Reply #50 posted 11/29/18 12:57pm

Latin

soulhead said:

Thanks everyone for your responses, insight and discussion.



Although we are not currently planning to cover each and EVERY artist released, our initial lineup (still finalizing) includes some popular and not so popular. All are worthy. Depending on how our initial volumes are received, we will most definitely explore further.



We officially launched with the intro posted but then followed up with a live discussion event, "Prince VS. Hip-Hop: A Dis...p with Rap" in Los Angeles at the Metaphor Club. It was amazing and Andre' Cymone and his amazing wife Katherine joined as well. Even Prince's own nephew was in attendance! The house was packed and Miles Marhsall Lewis on soulhead founder, Ron Worthy spoke on the subject.



The same day, we released the first of a 3 part essay called "Silly Rappers Talking Silly," which includes bits of conversations Miles had with Paisley Park rapper T.C. Ellis. The piece sticked to the facts and was a fair assessment of Ellis' True Confessions as well as his relationship with Prince among other related topics. I think you will like it.



Here are the links to all of the parts:



Intro


Part 1


Part 2


Part 3



In terms of the upcoming pieces, I invite you to follow soulhead and Miles on social media.



soulhead


Facebook


Twitter


Instagram



Miles Marshall Lewis


Facebook


Twitter


Instagram



Please check it out and let us know what you think.



Ron Worthy


Founder, soulhead.com






Thanks for sharing.
smile
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Reply #51 posted 11/29/18 1:05pm

soulhead

Latin said:

Check out the following new series of essays published by Soulhead entitled "Introducing…Paisley Diaries by Miles Marshall Lewis": "Miles has created a wonderful prologue into the world of Paisley Park below. The overview includes direct first-person quotes from Prince and provides the necessary background for new devotees and a fun primer for the most committed members of the Purple Army." Here it is: https://www.soulhead.com/...all-lewis/

Thanks for sharing BTW.

Here is the official banner:

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Reply #52 posted 11/29/18 1:12pm

databank

avatar

databank said:

soulhead said:

Thanks everyone for your responses, insight and discussion.

Although we are not currently planning to cover each and EVERY artist released, our initial lineup (still finalizing) includes some popular and not so popular. All are worthy. Depending on how our initial volumes are received, we will most definitely explore further.

We officially launched with the intro posted but then followed up with a live discussion event, "Prince VS. Hip-Hop: A Dis...p with Rap" in Los Angeles at the Metaphor Club. It was amazing and Andre' Cymone and his amazing wife Katherine joined as well. Even Prince's own nephew was in attendance! The house was packed and Miles Marhsall Lewis on soulhead founder, Ron Worthy spoke on the subject.

The same day, we released the first of a 3 part essay called "Silly Rappers Talking Silly," which includes bits of conversations Miles had with Paisley Park rapper T.C. Ellis. The piece sticked to the facts and was a fair assessment of Ellis' True Confessions as well as his relationship with Prince among other related topics. I think you will like it.

Here are the links to all of the parts:

Intro

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

In terms of the upcoming pieces, I invite you to follow soulhead and Miles on social media.

soulhead

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Miles Marshall Lewis

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Please check it out and let us know what you think.

Ron Worthy

Founder, soulhead.com

Thx for the good work. My critics aimed to be contructive and I look forward to reading the rest. I also realize that the readership isn't just made of hardcore fans and that many people will learn a lot from those articles. I actually realized after posting that I did learn one thing: I wasn't aware of the fact that TC had been offered Tony M's place in the NPG. Regarding factual errors there might be a fifth one regarding the album's recording dates but I'm not sure: previous research (Nilsen, Uptown and co.) could also be inaccurate. Regardless, it's nice to see the label getting some attention, it was an important part of our lives as fans. Peace hug

.

Just to clarify the factual errors I spotted so not too sound esoteric. Please keep in mind that I'm pointing those respectfully, and that I don't mean to imply that they undermine the overall quality of the article, but maybe the author would wish to correct them:

.

- Unsure why Trey Lewd is said to have done any "ghostwriting" because he is officially credited as co-author on the track "Bustin'", unless of course he did more than that.

.

- While "Bambi (Rap)" was indeed a Prince cover, "Girl O' My Dreams" was not: the original has been circulating on bootlegs ever since before TC's album was released, but remains unreleased to this day. Technically it should therefore be treated as an original song given by Prince to TC, not a cover, let alone a "nonsensical" one (since we weren't supposed to have heard the original in the first place).

.

- Matt Fink, from The Revolution, is said to be the only white member of the New Power Generation starting with Diamonds And Pearls, but he was already gone by then. The White keyboard player that appears on that album and remained in Prince's band until 1996 is Tommy Elm aka Tommy Barbarella.

.

- The article says that Tony M.'s last appearance on a Prince album was the 1992 Symbol album "besides a trio of commercially disatrous NPG solo albums to follow": Tony M. in fact only appeared on the first solo NPG album, 1993's Gold Nigga, but is entirely absent from the next two NPG albums (or any other Prince record after that).

.

- This one is a little debatable but technically, Warner Bros weren't "forced" to shut down the Paisley Park label after the Carmen Electra fiasco: Prince's public conflict with the label had begun by the time this decision was made, and while the Carmen Electra record played a great part in starting this conflict, WB chose to shut down the label and did so about a year after Carmen Electra was released (they also released three other Paisley Park albums between Carmen Electra and the label's demise). The details of how this went down remain a little obscure but apparently it was both a business decision and a way to retaliate after Prince repeatedly bashed them in public.

.

- Regarding recording dates, I'm not sure: we don't know much about the non-Prince songs, but while a first draft of "Miss Thang" was indeed recorded in the Summer of 1989 by Prince and TC without Levi Seacer, Jr. (this early mix was broadcast on KMOJ in September that same year), it was reworked by Junior Vasquez at a later date for the album. Besides, it is believed that "Girl O' My Dreams" was recorded by Levi and TC in late 1990 or early 1991, which may suggest that Levi and TC's core work on the record took place in 90-91. This is debatable as well, because the Nilsen/Uptown research is often subject to corrections as further research emerge, so I don't know. But I think it's important because the article makes a point of the fact that the record was shelved for 2 years between recording sessions and release, and that it made it signifcantly outdated by the time it came out. This may not be entirely accurate.

.

Again, thanks for the hard work and looking forward to reading what comes next hug

A COMPREHENSIVE PRINCE DISCOGRAPHY (work in progress ^^): https://sites.google.com/...iscog/home
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Reply #53 posted 11/29/18 2:13pm

violetcrush

databank said:

databank said:

Thx for the good work. My critics aimed to be contructive and I look forward to reading the rest. I also realize that the readership isn't just made of hardcore fans and that many people will learn a lot from those articles. I actually realized after posting that I did learn one thing: I wasn't aware of the fact that TC had been offered Tony M's place in the NPG. Regarding factual errors there might be a fifth one regarding the album's recording dates but I'm not sure: previous research (Nilsen, Uptown and co.) could also be inaccurate. Regardless, it's nice to see the label getting some attention, it was an important part of our lives as fans. Peace hug

.

Just to clarify the factual errors I spotted so not too sound esoteric. Please keep in mind that I'm pointing those respectfully, and that I don't mean to imply that they undermine the overall quality of the article, but maybe the author would wish to correct them:

.

- Unsure why Trey Lewd is said to have done any "ghostwriting" because he is officially credited as co-author on the track "Bustin'", unless of course he did more than that.

.

- While "Bambi (Rap)" was indeed a Prince cover, "Girl O' My Dreams" was not: the original has been circulating on bootlegs ever since before TC's album was released, but remains unreleased to this day. Technically it should therefore be treated as an original song given by Prince to TC, not a cover, let alone a "nonsensical" one (since we weren't supposed to have heard the original in the first place).

.

- Matt Fink, from The Revolution, is said to be the only white member of the New Power Generation starting with Diamonds And Pearls, but he was already gone by then. The White keyboard player that appears on that album and remained in Prince's band until 1996 is Tommy Elm aka Tommy Barbarella.

.

- The article says that Tony M.'s last appearance on a Prince album was the 1992 Symbol album "besides a trio of commercially disatrous NPG solo albums to follow": Tony M. in fact only appeared on the first solo NPG album, 1993's Gold Nigga, but is entirely absent from the next two NPG albums (or any other Prince record after that).

.

- This one is a little debatable but technically, Warner Bros weren't "forced" to shut down the Paisley Park label after the Carmen Electra fiasco: Prince's public conflict with the label had begun by the time this decision was made, and while the Carmen Electra record played a great part in starting this conflict, WB chose to shut down the label and did so about a year after Carmen Electra was released (they also released three other Paisley Park albums between Carmen Electra and the label's demise). The details of how this went down remain a little obscure but apparently it was both a business decision and a way to retaliate after Prince repeatedly bashed them in public.

.

- Regarding recording dates, I'm not sure: we don't know much about the non-Prince songs, but while a first draft of "Miss Thang" was indeed recorded in the Summer of 1989 by Prince and TC without Levi Seacer, Jr. (this early mix was broadcast on KMOJ in September that same year), it was reworked by Junior Vasquez at a later date for the album. Besides, it is believed that "Girl O' My Dreams" was recorded by Levi and TC in late 1990 or early 1991, which may suggest that Levi and TC's core work on the record took place in 90-91. This is debatable as well, because the Nilsen/Uptown research is often subject to corrections as further research emerge, so I don't know. But I think it's important because the article makes a point of the fact that the record was shelved for 2 years between recording sessions and release, and that it made it signifcantly outdated by the time it came out. This may not be entirely accurate.

.

Again, thanks for the hard work and looking forward to reading what comes next hug

Databank: here is the interview Tommy Barbarella did with Rolling Stone magazine for hte article "Prince in the 90's: An Oral History":

*

Tommy Barbarella (keyboardist 1990-1996): I cut my teeth with cover bands and ended up hooking up with the Steele family. Prince came down to see us a new club. He would come with Kim Basinger, and they would sit up there and watch. He had done an [unreleased] record on Margie Cox, a great local singer, called Flash, and they were going to open for him on the Nude Tour in 1990. During rehearsals, the keyboard player decided he didn’t want to do it and I was the first call. I’m like, “Of course.” One day Prince came to the rehearsals. He’d written all these songs and asked Sonny [Thompson, bassist] and Michael [Bland] and I to stay after and help him with a song. We helped him finish a song he’d written on piano, and he wanted to see what it would sound like if we did this or that. He ended up recording the song and it ended up going on the record like that, and that song was “Diamonds and Pearls.” Five months later I got the call to join this band, and that started that new era, the New Power Generation.

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