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Thread started 11/19/18 12:45pm

Strawberrylova
123

interesting info regarding prince's Genealogy/Ancestry

this post has been viral all over the internet

* Keep the discussion specifically on Prince's geneology and the information provided

Talk of racial identity will be transfered to the P&R forum where a thread is being created *

3 miles from my house. In this cemetery lies Dinah Jenkins, the daughter of slaves, raised among the plantations surrounding Bayou Rapides. Her offspring fled Louisiana to Minnesota, during Jim Crow to avoid persecution. Two generations later, Mrs. Jenkins’ great-grandchild picked up a guitar. His name was PRINCE.

46179506_10218155781465492_2382787941027020800_n.jpg?_nc_cat=102&_nc_eui2=AeHsuxIPQlOEBI4mn4wOp5u6F39NjRqf0ne8OdqsPlqleOfiyVriDAZIZCEGV_7RSi4BfXU9NU9fsRsKzIhJqFHdL6SCWEQVWxfMBFLD1dvPdA&_nc_ht=scontent-ort2-2.xx&oh=e60041ba02a6704def7db44e507f8210&oe=5C7CFE37

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Reply #1 posted 11/19/18 12:46pm

Strawberrylova
123

Strawberrylova123 said:

this post has been viral all over the internet

3 miles from my house. In this cemetery lies Dinah Jenkins, the daughter of slaves, raised among the plantations surrounding Bayou Rapides. Her offspring fled Louisiana to Minnesota, during Jim Crow to avoid persecution. Two generations later, Mrs. Jenkins’ great-grandchild picked up a guitar. His name was PRINCE.

Prince: An Unsung History
October 28, 2017 ·
For whoever asked if any Native American ancestry exists in Prince's lineage, the answer is yes! Cherokee and Blackfoot blood in particular. One of his ancestors was the son of a slave master and freed Cherokee slave. However, his brothers disowned him when he married a Black woman. This would've likely left him out of receiving an inheritance from his parents.

Also, during the age of slavery it was not uncommon for Blacks and Native Americans to intermarry, the same also applied to Native Americans that married Scottish.

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Reply #2 posted 11/19/18 4:25pm

PURPLEIZED3121

wow, if true this is bloody amazing!

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Reply #3 posted 11/19/18 5:07pm

PennyPurple

avatar

Very interesting. Thanks for sharing!

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Reply #4 posted 11/19/18 5:48pm

pinkcashmere23

I had heard that he had Native American ancestry. Thanks for sharing!

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Reply #5 posted 11/19/18 7:22pm

Seahorsie

avatar

So, if I read this correctly, an ancestor was the son of a slave master as well as one being native American. Do you all interpret that to mean he had white blood in his ancestry as well? Maybe I am not understanding what the writer was trying to say.
hmm
Good morning children...take a look out your window, the world is falling...
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Reply #6 posted 11/19/18 7:46pm

Strawberrylova
123

Seahorsie said:

So, if I read this correctly, an ancestor was the son of a slave master as well as one being native American. Do you all interpret that to mean he had white blood in his ancestry as well? Maybe I am not understanding what the writer was trying to say. hmm

this is princes great grandfather. this is the Ancestor that they are talking about .

Edward Nelson

Also Known As: "Ed"
Birthdate: March 1862
Birthplace: Louisiana, United States
Death:
Immediate Family:

Son of John Nelson and NN NN
Husband of Emma Nelson
Father of Vieanna Nelson; Clarence Allen Nelson; Roberta Nelson; Mittie Maud Lena Gordon; Cleveland Nelson and 5 others
Brother of William Nelson

Occupation: Minister of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, laborer (1880)

    • mother

About Rev. Edward "Ed" Nelson

Edward Nelson, was the son of a wealthy white slave owner and a freed Cherokee Slave. Denounced by his half-brothers for his marriage to a black woman, Nelson left Louisiana and traveled throughout Arkansas and Louisiana as a minister for the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church.


  • Ed Nelson
  • 1900 United States Federal Census
  • Birth: Mar 1862 - Louisiana, United States
  • Residence: 1900 - Ward 2, Webster, Louisiana, USA
  • Wife: Emma Nelson
  • Children: Clarence Nelson, Roberta Nelson, Mittie Nelson, Cleveland Nelson, Edward Nelson

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Reply #7 posted 11/19/18 8:26pm

williamb610

Another connection between Prince and me again... Blackfoot Native Amerikan in my background, too!
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Reply #8 posted 11/19/18 8:51pm

PennyPurple

avatar

So where does Dinah Jenkins fit into the picture?

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Reply #9 posted 11/19/18 8:52pm

Strawberrylova
123

PennyPurple said:

So where does Dinah Jenkins fit into the picture?


Dinah jenkins is Carrie jenkins mother. Carrie jenkins is John Nelsons mother ❤❤
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Reply #10 posted 11/19/18 8:54pm

Strawberrylova
123

Strawberrylova123 said:



Seahorsie said:


So, if I read this correctly, an ancestor was the son of a slave master as well as one being native American. Do you all interpret that to mean he had white blood in his ancestry as well? Maybe I am not understanding what the writer was trying to say. hmm



this is princes great grandfather. this is the Ancestor that they are talking about .




















Edward Nelson


Also Known As:"Ed"
Birthdate:March 1862
Birthplace:Louisiana, United States
Death:
Immediate Family:

Son of John Nelson and NN NN
Husband of Emma Nelson
Father of Vieanna Nelson; Clarence Allen Nelson; Roberta Nelson; Mittie Maud Lena Gordon; Cleveland Nelson and 5 others
Brother of William Nelson


Occupation:Minister of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, laborer (1880)







    • mother










About Rev. Edward "Ed" Nelson




Edward Nelson, was the son of a wealthy white slave owner and a freed Cherokee Slave. Denounced by his half-brothers for his marriage to a black woman, Nelson left Louisiana and traveled throughout Arkansas and Louisiana as a minister for the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church.




  • Ed Nelson

  • 1900 United States Federal Census

  • Birth: Mar 1862 - Louisiana, United States

  • Residence: 1900 - Ward 2, Webster, Louisiana, USA

  • Wife: Emma Nelson

  • Children: Clarence Nelson, Roberta Nelson, Mittie Nelson, Cleveland Nelson, Edward Nelson






This is from john L nelsons paternal side, Dinah jenkins is from his maternal side
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Reply #11 posted 11/19/18 8:57pm

PennyPurple

avatar

Strawberrylova123 said:

PennyPurple said:

So where does Dinah Jenkins fit into the picture?

Dinah jenkins is Carrie jenkins mother. Carrie jenkins is John Nelsons mother ❤❤

So where is the Nelson name?

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Reply #12 posted 11/19/18 11:37pm

luv4u

Moderator

avatar

moderator

pinkcashmere23 said:

I had heard that he had Native American ancestry. Thanks for sharing!


Where's the genealogy documents to prove it?? Researching a family tree is not easy.

Edmonton, AB - canada

Ohh purple joy oh purple bliss oh purple rapture!
REAL MUSIC by REAL MUSICIANS - Prince
"I kind of wish there was a reason for Prince to make the site crash more" ~~ Ben
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Reply #13 posted 11/20/18 2:15am

Strawberrylova
123

PennyPurple said:



Strawberrylova123 said:


PennyPurple said:

So where does Dinah Jenkins fit into the picture?



Dinah jenkins is Carrie jenkins mother. Carrie jenkins is John Nelsons mother ❤❤

So where is the Nelson name?


Look at the post above
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Reply #14 posted 11/20/18 2:25am

darkroman

-

White and Cherokee ancestry certainly now do make a lot of sense.

It is good to see he had such a varied and rich heritage.

Very interesting indeed!




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Reply #15 posted 11/20/18 4:41am

PennyPurple

avatar

Strawberrylova123 said:

PennyPurple said:

So where is the Nelson name?

Look at the post above

You keep linking back to the Nelson name. But the Jenkins name wasn't a Nelson? The Jenkins name was from his Mothers side?

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Reply #16 posted 11/20/18 5:48am

Strawberrylova
123

PennyPurple said:



Strawberrylova123 said:


PennyPurple said:


So where is the Nelson name?



Look at the post above

You keep linking back to the Nelson name. But the Jenkins name wasn't a Nelson? The Jenkins name was from his Mothers side?


Yes, the jenkins name is from his maternal side,nelson from his paternal side. Your the one who asked me where the nelson name came from which i already explained.
[Edited 11/20/18 5:48am]
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Reply #17 posted 11/20/18 6:04am

Strawberrylova
123

Strawberrylova123 said:

PennyPurple said:



Strawberrylova123 said:


PennyPurple said:


So where is the Nelson name?



Look at the post above

You keep linking back to the Nelson name. But the Jenkins name wasn't a Nelson? The Jenkins name was from his Mothers side?


Yes, the jenkins name is from his maternal side,nelson from his paternal side. Your the one who asked me where the nelson name came from which i already explained.
[Edited 11/20/18 5:48am]

Johns maternal side, not princes
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Reply #18 posted 11/20/18 6:53am

PennyPurple

avatar

Strawberrylova123 said:

Strawberrylova123 said:
Yes, the jenkins name is from his maternal side,nelson from his paternal side. Your the one who asked me where the nelson name came from which i already explained. [Edited 11/20/18 5:48am]
Johns maternal side, not princes

Oh, Ok. All I was trying to do is figure it out because it wasn't making sense to me. I wasn't thinking Prince's maternal side.

Thanks for clearing that up for me.

[Edited 11/20/18 10:24am]

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Reply #19 posted 11/20/18 10:20am

babynoz

Strawberrylova123 said:

Seahorsie said:

So, if I read this correctly, an ancestor was the son of a slave master as well as one being native American. Do you all interpret that to mean he had white blood in his ancestry as well? Maybe I am not understanding what the writer was trying to say. hmm

this is princes great grandfather. this is the Ancestor that they are talking about .

ten28qad_medium.jpg

Edward Nelson

Also Known As: "Ed" Birthdate: March 1862 Birthplace: Louisiana, United States Death: Immediate Family:

Son of John Nelson and NN NN
Husband of Emma Nelson
Father of Vieanna Nelson; Clarence Allen Nelson; Roberta Nelson; Mittie Maud Lena Gordon; Cleveland Nelson and 5 others
Brother of William Nelson

Occupation: Minister of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, laborer (1880)

    • mother

About Rev. Edward "Ed" Nelson

Edward Nelson, was the son of a wealthy white slave owner and a freed Cherokee Slave. Denounced by his half-brothers for his marriage to a black woman, Nelson left Louisiana and traveled throughout Arkansas and Louisiana as a minister for the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church.

  • Ed Nelson
  • 1900 United States Federal Census
  • Birth: Mar 1862 - Louisiana, United States
  • Residence: 1900 - Ward 2, Webster, Louisiana, USA
  • Wife: Emma Nelson
  • Children: Clarence Nelson, Roberta Nelson, Mittie Nelson, Cleveland Nelson, Edward Nelson



The info from the site Geni.com was debunked in another thread because people were inserting fake white ancestors on his family tree. eek

ETA, I forgot that links don't work on this janky assed site. The thread title is "Prince's Family Tree Roots According to a site called Gen i" If you want to find the thread.




[Edited 11/20/18 10:23am]

Prince, in you I found a kindred spirit...Rest In Paradise.
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Reply #20 posted 11/20/18 10:24am

PennyPurple

avatar

babynoz said:

Strawberrylova123 said:

this is princes great grandfather. this is the Ancestor that they are talking about .

ten28qad_medium.jpg

Edward Nelson

Also Known As: "Ed" Birthdate: March 1862 Birthplace: Louisiana, United States Death: Immediate Family:

Son of John Nelson and NN NN
Husband of Emma Nelson
Father of Vieanna Nelson; Clarence Allen Nelson; Roberta Nelson; Mittie Maud Lena Gordon; Cleveland Nelson and 5 others
Brother of William Nelson

Occupation: Minister of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, laborer (1880)

    • mother

About Rev. Edward "Ed" Nelson

Edward Nelson, was the son of a wealthy white slave owner and a freed Cherokee Slave. Denounced by his half-brothers for his marriage to a black woman, Nelson left Louisiana and traveled throughout Arkansas and Louisiana as a minister for the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church.

  • Ed Nelson
  • 1900 United States Federal Census
  • Birth: Mar 1862 - Louisiana, United States
  • Residence: 1900 - Ward 2, Webster, Louisiana, USA
  • Wife: Emma Nelson
  • Children: Clarence Nelson, Roberta Nelson, Mittie Nelson, Cleveland Nelson, Edward Nelson



The info from the site Geni.com was debunked in another thread because people were inserting fake white ancestors on his family tree. eek

ETA, I forgot that links don't work on this janky assed site. The thread title is "Prince's Family Tree Roots According to a site called Gen i" If you want to find the thread.




[Edited 11/20/18 10:23am]

So this isn't true?

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Reply #21 posted 11/20/18 10:24am

Strawberrylova
123

Carrie Nelson (Jenkins)

Also Known As: "Carrie Jenkins", "Carrie Ikner", "Carrie Nelson"
Birthdate: May 1883 (50)
Birthplace: Louisiana, United States
Death: August 08, 1933 (50)
Hennepin County, Minnesota, United States
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Handy Jenkins and Dina Ann Jenkins
Wife of Clarence Allen Nelson and Charles Ikner
Mother of Gertrude Nelson; Olivia Nelson; Ruby Nelson; James L. Nelson and John Lewis Nelson
Sister of Thomas Jenkins; Sarah Jenkins; Margie Roberson; Marry Jenkins; Julia Jenkinsand 3 others

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Reply #22 posted 11/20/18 10:25am

Strawberrylova
123

Strawberrylova123 said:

Carrie Nelson (Jenkins)

Also Known As: "Carrie Jenkins", "Carrie Ikner", "Carrie Nelson"
Birthdate: May 1883 (50)
Birthplace: Louisiana, United States
Death: August 08, 1933 (50)
Hennepin County, Minnesota, United States
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Handy Jenkins and Dina Ann Jenkins
Wife of Clarence Allen Nelson and Charles Ikner
Mother of Gertrude Nelson; Olivia Nelson; Ruby Nelson; James L. Nelson and John Lewis Nelson
Sister of Thomas Jenkins; Sarah Jenkins; Margie Roberson; Marry Jenkins; Julia Jenkinsand 3 others

this is a picture of her

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Reply #23 posted 11/20/18 10:26am

Strawberrylova
123

carrie jenkins

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Reply #24 posted 11/20/18 10:26am

babynoz

PennyPurple said:

babynoz said:



The info from the site Geni.com was debunked in another thread because people were inserting fake white ancestors on his family tree. eek

ETA, I forgot that links don't work on this janky assed site. The thread title is "Prince's Family Tree Roots According to a site called Gen i" If you want to find the thread.




[Edited 11/20/18 10:23am]

So this isn't true?



You can't figure out which are real because some of them are photos from another Geni page that had nothing to do with Prince.

Prince, in you I found a kindred spirit...Rest In Paradise.
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Reply #25 posted 11/20/18 10:41am

Strawberrylova
123

THis thread is for FUN, its not meant for anyone to believe it or not. this is meant for the genealogist nerds like me <3

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Reply #26 posted 11/20/18 10:42am

Strawberrylova
123

princes grandma Carrie jenkins

Image result for carrie jenkins john l nelson

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Reply #27 posted 11/20/18 10:45am

Strawberrylova
123

princes great Aunt mittie maud Lena Gordon

ittie Maud Lena Gordon (Nelson)

Birthdate: August 1884 (77)
Birthplace: Webster Parish, Louisiana, United States
Death: 1961 (76)
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Rev. Edward "Ed" Nelson and Emma Nelson
Wife of Robert Holt and William Gordon
Sister of Vieanna Nelson; Clarence Allen Nelson; Roberta Nelson; Cleveland Nelson; Edward Nelson and 4 others

Occupation: President of the Peace Movement of Ethiopia

About Mittie Maud Lena Gordon

Mittie Maud Lena Gordon, president of the Peace Movement of Ethiopia (PME), was born in Webster Parish, Louisiana. Her father, Edward Nelson, was the son of a wealthy white slave owner and a freed Cherokee slave. Her mother, Emma Hardy, was black. Denounced by his half-brothers for his marriage to a black woman, Nelson left Louisiana and traveled throughout Arkansas and Louisian as a minister for the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church. Young Mittie traveled with him from 1897 to 1913. At the age of nine she witness a lynching of a black man by a white mob.

Gordon married Robert Holt in 1903 and had two children. Holt died in 1906, and Gordon was married a second time, in 1920, to William Gordon of Chicago. Having been taught about the theories of Henry McNeal Turner and other earlier black nationalists by her father, Gordon was attracted to Garveyism and the UNIA. She became involved with the UNIA in Chicago and served as a delegate to the 1929 UNIA convention in Jamaica. She was disillusioned by the factionalization she witnessed in Jamaica and returned to Chicago with the desire to found an organization with a single issue that would avoid the over-diffusion she felt had been the downfall of the UNIA. The PME was founded in the back of her husband's Chicago restaurant in December 1932. Beginning with Gordon as president and twelve other members, the stated goal of the new organization was the repatration to Liberia of North America's black population by means of massive federal aid. Gordon's strategy was to circulate petitions among blacks asking for their endorsement of the cause and then to use these petitions for lobbying purposes. A petition with some four hundred thousand signatures was sent to President Roosevelt in 1933 but was, like all future correspondences from the PME, promptly channeled to the Department of State and, within it, to the Division of Western European Affairs, which replied that interference by the United States with European holdings in Africa for the purpose of acquiring land for black colonization was not pragmatic. All other efforts of PME delegates to meet with President Roosevelt were similarily rebuffed.

Failing on her own account to penetrate official circles, Gordon began to formulate alliances with influential white racists who shared her faith in repatriation as a solution to racial tension and as a permanent means for the prevention of amalgamation. Gordon contacted Earnest S. Cox in March 1934. He became the national representative of the PME (1936), and he and Gordon worked in tandem on a four-point program. With Cox as a spokesperson, they continued to try to contact the president, to reawaken the American Colonization Society's interest in colonization, and earn an endorsement for their plan from President Edwin Barclay of Liberia. They also approached the Virginia legislature to present a prorepatriation resolution to Congress.

They were successful with the Virginia General Assembly, where almost one million signatures gathered by the PME, UNIA, and other black organizations were presented to the legislators, who responded by passing the desired memorial in March 1936. This success was followed by an encouraging letter from Barclay's aide-de-camp welcoming African-American immigrants to Liberia. Two members of the PME, David Logan and Joseph Rockmore, went to Liberia as emissaries in 1938. Their passage was paid by PME members who had raised the money through the collectio and sale of rags and bottles. State Department officials reported "that President Barclay does not take seriously the expressed hopes of the PME that financial support will be received from the United States," and thus placed monetary restrictios (proof of at least $1000 in assets for each immigrant) on his "welcome" to potential colonizers. Logan and Rockmore remained in Liberia for one month, spending much of their time in the company of T.J.R. Faulkner, a Marcus Garvey sympathizer and proponent of mass migration.

By 1939 the PME had collected over two million names on its petition. They had also found a new ally in Theodore Bilbo. Both Gordon and Cox were present in Washington D.C., when the Bilbo Greater Liberia Bill was introduced in the Senate on 24 April 1939. Despite Gordon's hopes and several efforts to have it reintroduced in future sessions of Congress, the bill was unsuccessful, dying with its senatorial advocate in 1947.

The third and final alliance forged by the PME in its search for federal backing was the Senator William Langer of North Dakota and the Universal African Nationalist Movement (UANM), an outgrowth of the UNIA in New York. The UANM was headed by Benjamin Gibbons (president general) and Benjamin Jones (executive secretary). The UANM had contacted Langer with its own version of a repatriation bill and Cox convinced Gordon to go against her misgivings and throw PME backing behind their efforts. The Langer bill was first introduced in 1949 and was continually reintroduced until Langer's death in 1959. It was never reported out of committee. Gordon herself died two years later, never having seen Liberia or any lasting effects from her thirty years of extensive lobbying

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Reply #28 posted 11/20/18 10:47am

Strawberrylova
123

Strawberrylova123 said:

princes great Aunt mittie maud Lena Gordon

ittie Maud Lena Gordon (Nelson)

Birthdate: August 1884 (77)
Birthplace: Webster Parish, Louisiana, United States
Death: 1961 (76)
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Rev. Edward "Ed" Nelson and Emma Nelson
Wife of Robert Holt and William Gordon
Sister of Vieanna Nelson; Clarence Allen Nelson; Roberta Nelson; Cleveland Nelson; Edward Nelson and 4 others

Occupation: President of the Peace Movement of Ethiopia

About Mittie Maud Lena Gordon

Mittie Maud Lena Gordon, president of the Peace Movement of Ethiopia (PME), was born in Webster Parish, Louisiana. Her father, Edward Nelson, was the son of a wealthy white slave owner and a freed Cherokee slave. Her mother, Emma Hardy, was black. Denounced by his half-brothers for his marriage to a black woman, Nelson left Louisiana and traveled throughout Arkansas and Louisian as a minister for the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church. Young Mittie traveled with him from 1897 to 1913. At the age of nine she witness a lynching of a black man by a white mob.

Gordon married Robert Holt in 1903 and had two children. Holt died in 1906, and Gordon was married a second time, in 1920, to William Gordon of Chicago. Having been taught about the theories of Henry McNeal Turner and other earlier black nationalists by her father, Gordon was attracted to Garveyism and the UNIA. She became involved with the UNIA in Chicago and served as a delegate to the 1929 UNIA convention in Jamaica. She was disillusioned by the factionalization she witnessed in Jamaica and returned to Chicago with the desire to found an organization with a single issue that would avoid the over-diffusion she felt had been the downfall of the UNIA. The PME was founded in the back of her husband's Chicago restaurant in December 1932. Beginning with Gordon as president and twelve other members, the stated goal of the new organization was the repatration to Liberia of North America's black population by means of massive federal aid. Gordon's strategy was to circulate petitions among blacks asking for their endorsement of the cause and then to use these petitions for lobbying purposes. A petition with some four hundred thousand signatures was sent to President Roosevelt in 1933 but was, like all future correspondences from the PME, promptly channeled to the Department of State and, within it, to the Division of Western European Affairs, which replied that interference by the United States with European holdings in Africa for the purpose of acquiring land for black colonization was not pragmatic. All other efforts of PME delegates to meet with President Roosevelt were similarily rebuffed.

Failing on her own account to penetrate official circles, Gordon began to formulate alliances with influential white racists who shared her faith in repatriation as a solution to racial tension and as a permanent means for the prevention of amalgamation. Gordon contacted Earnest S. Cox in March 1934. He became the national representative of the PME (1936), and he and Gordon worked in tandem on a four-point program. With Cox as a spokesperson, they continued to try to contact the president, to reawaken the American Colonization Society's interest in colonization, and earn an endorsement for their plan from President Edwin Barclay of Liberia. They also approached the Virginia legislature to present a prorepatriation resolution to Congress.

They were successful with the Virginia General Assembly, where almost one million signatures gathered by the PME, UNIA, and other black organizations were presented to the legislators, who responded by passing the desired memorial in March 1936. This success was followed by an encouraging letter from Barclay's aide-de-camp welcoming African-American immigrants to Liberia. Two members of the PME, David Logan and Joseph Rockmore, went to Liberia as emissaries in 1938. Their passage was paid by PME members who had raised the money through the collectio and sale of rags and bottles. State Department officials reported "that President Barclay does not take seriously the expressed hopes of the PME that financial support will be received from the United States," and thus placed monetary restrictios (proof of at least $1000 in assets for each immigrant) on his "welcome" to potential colonizers. Logan and Rockmore remained in Liberia for one month, spending much of their time in the company of T.J.R. Faulkner, a Marcus Garvey sympathizer and proponent of mass migration.

By 1939 the PME had collected over two million names on its petition. They had also found a new ally in Theodore Bilbo. Both Gordon and Cox were present in Washington D.C., when the Bilbo Greater Liberia Bill was introduced in the Senate on 24 April 1939. Despite Gordon's hopes and several efforts to have it reintroduced in future sessions of Congress, the bill was unsuccessful, dying with its senatorial advocate in 1947.

The third and final alliance forged by the PME in its search for federal backing was the Senator William Langer of North Dakota and the Universal African Nationalist Movement (UANM), an outgrowth of the UNIA in New York. The UANM was headed by Benjamin Gibbons (president general) and Benjamin Jones (executive secretary). The UANM had contacted Langer with its own version of a repatriation bill and Cox convinced Gordon to go against her misgivings and throw PME backing behind their efforts. The Langer bill was first introduced in 1949 and was continually reintroduced until Langer's death in 1959. It was never reported out of committee. Gordon herself died two years later, never having seen Liberia or any lasting effects from her thirty years of extensive lobbying

heres a photo of her

Image result for mittie maude lena gordon

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Reply #29 posted 11/20/18 10:52am

ABro

babynoz said:

Strawberrylova123 said:

this is princes great grandfather. this is the Ancestor that they are talking about .

ten28qad_medium.jpg

Edward Nelson

Also Known As: "Ed" Birthdate: March 1862 Birthplace: Louisiana, United States Death: Immediate Family:

Son of John Nelson and NN NN
Husband of Emma Nelson
Father of Vieanna Nelson; Clarence Allen Nelson; Roberta Nelson; Mittie Maud Lena Gordon; Cleveland Nelson and 5 others
Brother of William Nelson

Occupation: Minister of the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church, laborer (1880)

    • mother

About Rev. Edward "Ed" Nelson

Edward Nelson, was the son of a wealthy white slave owner and a freed Cherokee Slave. Denounced by his half-brothers for his marriage to a black woman, Nelson left Louisiana and traveled throughout Arkansas and Louisiana as a minister for the Colored Methodist Episcopal Church.

  • Ed Nelson
  • 1900 United States Federal Census
  • Birth: Mar 1862 - Louisiana, United States
  • Residence: 1900 - Ward 2, Webster, Louisiana, USA
  • Wife: Emma Nelson
  • Children: Clarence Nelson, Roberta Nelson, Mittie Nelson, Cleveland Nelson, Edward Nelson



The info from the site Geni.com was debunked in another thread because people were inserting fake white ancestors on his family tree. eek

ETA, I forgot that links don't work on this janky assed site. The thread title is "Prince's Family Tree Roots According to a site called Gen i" If you want to find the thread.




[Edited 11/20/18 10:23am]

Yes, I wondered if it was from that bogus info again. Thanks for clearing that up.

"So much has been written about me, & people don't know what's right & what's wrong. I'd rather let them stay confused." ~ Prince.
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