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Thread started 08/17/19 12:05am

LeeMiller

Your favorite female jazz singer?

I like Dianne Reeves . Blessed with a lithe, five-octave voice, this multi-Grammy-winner from Detroit (who was raised in Denver, Colorado) has been recording since the 70s, when she guested on albums by Ronnie Laws and her cousin George Duke. Though her solo career began in 1982, Reeves gained wider exposure after joining Blue Note in 1987, where she stayed until 2008. Though she can sing straight-ahead jazz with aplomb (she’s particularly adept at scat singing), Reeves is a noted songwriter and also something of a musical shape-shifter who can convincingly switch from jazz and fusion to Latin, pop, R&B, and Caribbean music. The 25 Best Female Jazz Singers Of All Time: https://docsbay.net/the-2...f-all-time What about yours?
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Reply #1 posted 08/17/19 12:30pm

kitbradley

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Living, definately Dianne Reeves. But I do love her R&B stuff, also. For the ones no longer with us I would say Nancy Wilson and Billie Holiday.
[Edited 8/17/19 12:34pm]
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Reply #2 posted 08/17/19 4:00pm

TrivialPursuit

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Dianne is wonderful.
Ella, Billie, Nancy (as mentioned) - no contest.

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Reply #3 posted 08/17/19 11:02pm

whitechocolate
brotha

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Shirley Horn, Kimiko Itoh and Anita Oday. I know this thread asks for one, but I can only get it down to my top three. Much luv! <3

Hungry? Just look in the mirror and get fed up.
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Reply #4 posted 08/18/19 9:46am

CherryMoon57

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Sarah Vaughan for her warm and supple vocal texture. She could sing anything from opera to bebop and Bossa Nova and her version of Lullaby of Birdland is out of this world. https://www.youtube.com/w...1mNPDwTo_o

Sarah Vaughan - William P. Gottlieb - No. 1.jpg

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Reply #5 posted 08/18/19 4:32pm

neowa

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Rachelle Ferrell

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Reply #6 posted 08/18/19 7:06pm

S2DG

Ella Jane Fitzgerald

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Reply #7 posted 08/23/19 11:06am

domainator2010

I've never heard much jazz, does Norah Jones count? And my new discovery, Sanjeeta Bhattacharya?? (see my thread about her):

https://prince.org/msg/8/460560

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Reply #8 posted 08/23/19 11:24am

StrangeButTrue

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Carmen McRae, Astrud Gilberto, Nina

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Reply #9 posted 08/23/19 12:02pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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Lena Horne

Shirley Horn

Diane Reeves

Nancy Wilson

Lindsey Webster

Randy Crawford

Billie Holiday

Nora Jones
Rochelle Forelle

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

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Reply #10 posted 08/23/19 2:53pm

JoeBala

I have alot. I'll start with Carmen McRae (1922-1994)
Harlem-born McRae was an able pianist as well as a spectacular singer. Like many of the best jazz singers of the post-war era, her prime vocal influence was Billie Holiday, whose rubato, behind-the-beat phrasing she borrowed, though she established her own, instantly recognisable style early on. McRae rose to fame in the 50s and was renowned for her supple voice and putting an ironic twist on lyrics. Check out her version of Fly Me To The Moon spectacular.
Just Music-No Categories-Enjoy It!
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Reply #11 posted 08/23/19 4:53pm

Cloudbuster

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Billie.

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Reply #12 posted 08/23/19 9:42pm

CynicKill

Sarah of course.

Living there's a new singer named Jazzmeia Horn.

https://www.youtube.com/w...mI-anDxMUc

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Reply #13 posted 08/23/19 9:47pm

CynicKill

Oh damn how could I forget Cecile Mcloren Salvant?!?

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Reply #14 posted 08/24/19 12:58pm

RJOrion

when Chaka Khan sings jazz, she is my favorite...also Rachelle Ferrell...
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Reply #15 posted 08/24/19 6:58pm

Missmusicluver
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Growing up, my dad used to play alot of Nancy Wilson, Ella Fitzgerald and Sarah Vaughn, fabulous. I also like Billie Holliday, Rachelle Ferrell and Norah Jones too. And yes I love to hear Chaka Khan sing jazz also.

[Edited 8/24/19 18:59pm]

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Reply #16 posted 08/25/19 2:05pm

Free2BMe

Sarah Vaughn
Nancy Wilson
Billie Holiday
Ella Fitzgerald
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Reply #17 posted 08/25/19 5:33pm

Goddess4Real

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Great choices thumbs up! I would also like to add Peggy Lee to the list nod Peggy Lee - Essentials, a Best Of Jazz Hits & Standards https://www.youtube.com/w...P-RP8cI2yI

5b38c22505cf3fc6e30fd1a4402d8dc776f1eb18

[Edited 8/25/19 17:58pm]

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Reply #18 posted 08/25/19 6:32pm

OldFriends4Sal
e

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Randy Crawford- - Everything Must Change live (1970's)

#IDEFINEME #ALBUMSSTILLMATTER

A Liar Shall Not Tarry In My Presence
I will make you cyber shit in your pants!
What's the matter with your life
Is poverty bringing U down?
Is the mailman jerking U 'round?
Did he put your million dollar check
In
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Reply #19 posted 08/29/19 5:22pm

TD3

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Sarah Vaughan

Ella Fitzgerald

Billie Holiday

Diana Washington

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Reply #20 posted 09/06/19 5:25pm

Hamad

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TD3 said:

Sarah Vaughan

Ella Fitzgerald

Billie Holiday

Diana Washington

Couldn't have said it better. Billie Holiday was my introduction because her voice reminded me SO much of a Kuwaiti singer that was popular back in the 60s/70s named Aisha El-Marta, not full on range but HUGE on emotional value and soul, same pained raspy quality too. Harlepolis introduced me to Billie because she was her fave artists and as an association my interest trickled into the other ladies as well. One thing I noticed, ALL of their discography are extremely versatile and interesting (despite the dimensional genre tag). Also, seeing that all of them came within the same time frame more or less (Billie & Ella being earlier birds) the four complimented each other SO well and all of them have distinctive styles that differed from everyone else, even the artists they influenced later in life.

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Reply #21 posted 09/06/19 9:21pm

kitbradley

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I know she wasn’t around long enough but I dare to add Amy Winehouse to the list. She was bloody brilliant as a Jazz singer. Anyone who has the deluxe version of “Frank” knows what I’m talking about. And the duet with Tony Bennett “Body & Soul”, she sounds so much like Billie during her final years, it’s haunting. I remember reading before she got a recording contract, her live shows consisted mostly of jazz tunes. I have a feeling she would have delivered a killer jazz album if she were still here.
"It's not nice to fuck with K.B.! All you haters will see!" - Kitbradley
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Reply #22 posted 09/07/19 7:26pm

kitbradley

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I have to add Marlena Shaw to my list, also.

"It's not nice to fuck with K.B.! All you haters will see!" - Kitbradley
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Reply #23 posted 09/07/19 10:34pm

hausofmoi7

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domainator2010 said:

I've never heard much jazz, does Norah Jones count? And my new discovery, Sanjeeta Bhattacharya?? (see my thread about her):



https://prince.org/msg/8/460560


Norah Jones I think is Jazz.
Jill Scott would be my pick, not sure if it would be considered Jazz.
But Jill’s Vocal at times can be very staccato although it’s probably technically considered soul/r&b.
The production is definitely modern Jazz though.
“It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non- violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection” - Lesley Hazleton on the first Muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #24 posted 09/07/19 11:33pm

hausofmoi7

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Is “alternative r&b” sub-genre technically modern Jazz music?
What would be considered Jazz vocal stylings often fall within the “alternative r&b” genre.
“It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non- violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection” - Lesley Hazleton on the first Muslim, the prophet.
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Reply #25 posted 09/08/19 12:42am

hausofmoi7

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Tracey Thorn is one of my favourite vocalists and I think is technically a Jazz singer.
https://youtu.be/gEMVC024oYs


Sampha reminds me of Tracey Thorn. Very similar vocal delivery and tone.
https://youtu.be/FF8okFt4bGg


Not only do they sound very similar but both at times place their somber and jazzy vocals against a backdrop of upbeat dance music.
Which is the total opposite of their vocals emotional resonance.




.
[Edited 9/8/19 2:05am]
“It means finding the very human narrative of a man navigating between idealism and pragmatism, faith and politics, non- violence, the pitfalls of acclaim as the perils of rejection” - Lesley Hazleton on the first Muslim, the prophet.
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